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  1. Tide's Avatar

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    #1

    hi native speakers! please answer

    When do youy use <costly> instead of <ekspensive>?( sorry my key board didn't write the letter iks !)

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    I'm a native speaker in the US, and really the only time I'd use "costly" is perhaps in writing (not speaking), and only in non-finanacial terms (i.e. "The war in Iraq is proving costly in human lives.") When speaking of something that costs a lot of money, I always refer to it as "expensive."

  3. Saxonlight's Avatar

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    #3

    Talking Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    The two are pretty close.

    I would say expensive would tend to be more associated with money. Costly can be about money too but like Ouisch said is good for non-money related cost too.

    It depends on the context and the persons vocabulary I think. Costly is much more uncommon in everyday life.

    Money

    "That Rolex watch is a bit too expensive for me." WORKS WELL
    "That Rolex watch is a bit costly for me." WORKS

    Non-money

    "The army attack was expensive in terms of lives lost." WORKS
    "The army attack was costly in terms of lives lost." WORKS WELL
    Last edited by Saxonlight; 08-Jul-2006 at 00:10.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    I agree with the others. The word costly is more likely to be used where the implications are not necessarily monetary. Example:
    A supervisor's mistakes are costlier that those of a regular employee.
    Sincerely,

    RonBee

  5. Fazzu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Sir Ronbee,

    Isn't that "A supervisor's mistakes are costlier than those of a regular employee"?

    Sorry to bother,I'm a girl who likes to ask many questions especially on the usage of English.

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    #6

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Yes, it's a typo and should be 'than'.

  6. Tide's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch
    I'm a native speaker in the US, and really the only time I'd use "costly" is perhaps in writing (not speaking), and only in non-finanacial terms (i.e. "The war in Iraq is proving costly in human lives.") When speaking of something that costs a lot of money, I always refer to it as "expensive."

    Thanks everybody especialy the American native!

  7. Fazzu's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Thanks Tdol.I thought some grammar rules were behind it.

  8. Tide's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Quote Originally Posted by moallem
    When do youy use <costly> instead of <ekspensive>?( sorry my key board didn't write the letter iks !)

    By the way! When do you use ekcessive?(Remember that my keyboard doesnt write the letter iks!)

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    #10

    Re: hi native speakers! please answer

    Whenever something passes a limit, it can be described as excessive, whether it's a vehicle's speed or the heat.

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