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  1. #1
    Drkaraokephd Guest

    Default I'm curious to the grammar used in this legal documentation.

    "Parents, children, brothers and sisters (over the age of 18) permanently residing with you."
    My question is this....
    The insurers are stating, that the grammar used in this sentance means that all people (Parent; children; brothers and sisters) are over the age of 18!!
    My interprotation is that, only the brothers and sisters are over the age of 18.
    How would the teachers understand the context of the passage??
    Thank you in advance
    Nigel

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    19
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    Default Re: I'm curious to the grammar used in this legal documentation.

    They are saying that the contract or document or the insurance coverage provided applies to brothers and sisters (over the age of 18) that are permanently living with you.

    They are using "(over the age of 18)" to separate them from brothers and sisters under the age of 18.

    In other words - whatever the contract or document says related to that sentence only applies to brothers and sisters over the age of 18. It does not apply to brothers and sisters under the age of 18.

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