Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default can anyone tell me?

    what do
    " help yourself " ,
    " I'll see to it ",
    " I can't help it" ,
    " I'll fix you Up" and
    "you set me up"
    mean?
    and in what occasion we can use them?(any example?)
    somebody explain to me,pls?
    Last edited by ahfan_85; 16-Jul-2006 at 17:25.

  2. #2
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    " help yourself "
    The speaker is inviting you to take something without asking permission or without waiting to be served.
    "There are sandwiches and cold drinks in the refrigerator, please help yourself."

    " I'll see to it "
    The speaker will take whatever action necessary to handle a situation.
    "I'm sorry your food was cold," the restaurant manager said, "I'll see to it that your bill is paid for."


    " I can't help it"
    Used to explain something that is presumably beyond your control. (Although it's often just used as an excuse.)
    "The doctor said my blood sugar is too high, so I shouldn't be eating this cake," she said, taking a large bite. "But I can't help it - I love chocolate!"

    " I'll fix you Up"
    Can be used several ways; usually used in terms of arranging a "date" or a romance between two people. Also used to mean making arrangements or accommodations for someone.
    "Harvey is a great guy; good-looking and he loves to go boating, just like you. I'll fix you up with him."
    "If you agree to be my personal assistant, I'll fix you up with an expense account and a company car."

    "you set me up"
    Again, it depends upon the context. Usually it means the speaker has been deliberately tricked or duped by someone.
    "You knew that chair was broken, yet you said nothing when I went to sit in it. You set me up!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    thxs for ur reply...
    completely understood~
    ;)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    im just confused,
    the words like:
    "buzz off!"
    "break a leg"
    "brown bagging"
    "can you dig it?"

    are international english or just american English?

  5. #5
    DavyBCN's Avatar
    DavyBCN is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Wales
      • Current Location:
      • Rwanda
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    Quote Originally Posted by ahfan_85
    im just confused,
    the words like:
    "buzz off!"
    "break a leg"
    "brown bagging"
    "can you dig it?"
    are international english or just american English?

    Buzz off and break a leg are definitely phrases which his BE has used many times. I have never heard brown bagging - something to do with supermarket shopping or bribery? . Can you dig it to me is AE and was only used in BE for a short time some years ago. But perhaps it is coming back into fashion again?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    Quote Originally Posted by DavyBCN
    Buzz off and break a leg are definitely phrases which his BE has used many times. I have never heard brown bagging - something to do with supermarket shopping or bribery? . Can you dig it to me is AE and was only used in BE for a short time some years ago. But perhaps it is coming back into fashion again?
    well,
    i found these phases from a book.
    im confused whether i can use these phases in exam or not,
    coz im from Malaysia,
    im not sure if AE can be accepted...

    ps:
    brown bagging had the meaning of providing lunch for oneself or taking one's lunch to eat in the presence of one's company.Usually the food is kept in a brown paper bag,so it has this name.The persons who take their lunch with them are called brown baggers.
    Last edited by ahfan_85; 25-Jul-2006 at 17:22.

  7. #7
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    buzz off
    A sarcastic way of saying "get out of here" or "go away."

    break a leg
    A phrase originally used in show business to wish a performer good luck. There is some sort of stage superstition that actually saying "good luck" would bring disaster to the performance, so "break a leg" became the substitute phrase. Now it's often used to wish someone good luck in any type of endeavor.

    brown bagging
    As you mentioned, this means to bring your own food or refreshments, rather than dining out or buying your food on the premises.
    "Do you want to go down to the cafeteria for lunch?" "No, I'm brown bagging it today."

    can you dig it?
    Originally a slang phrase used by hippies and beatniks in the 1960s, but it is still used today, particularly in the hip-hop or rap community. It means "do you understand?" or "do you get my meaning?"

    All of these phrases are basically considered slang, but are regularly used in casual conversation. The exception is "can you dig it," which today is usually only used in song lyrics. Or by aging hippies.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch
    buzz off
    A sarcastic way of saying "get out of here" or "go away."
    break a leg
    A phrase originally used in show business to wish a performer good luck. There is some sort of stage superstition that actually saying "good luck" would bring disaster to the performance, so "break a leg" became the substitute phrase. Now it's often used to wish someone good luck in any type of endeavor.
    brown bagging
    As you mentioned, this means to bring your own food or refreshments, rather than dining out or buying your food on the premises.
    "Do you want to go down to the cafeteria for lunch?" "No, I'm brown bagging it today."
    can you dig it?
    Originally a slang phrase used by hippies and beatniks in the 1960s, but it is still used today, particularly in the hip-hop or rap community. It means "do you understand?" or "do you get my meaning?"
    All of these phrases are basically considered slang, but are regularly used in casual conversation. The exception is "can you dig it," which today is usually only used in song lyrics. Or by aging hippies.
    thanks again for your clear explanation...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    anybody tells me the difference between ' in time ' and 'on time ' ?

  10. #10
    DavyBCN's Avatar
    DavyBCN is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Wales
      • Current Location:
      • Rwanda
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: can anyone tell me?

    Quote Originally Posted by ahfan_85
    anybody tells me the difference between ' in time ' and 'on time ' ?

    I you have a train to catch at 10am and you arrive "in time" then you arrive in advance of 10am. If you arrive "on time" you arrive at 10am.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk