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  1. #1
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    present perfect confusion again....

    according to the definition: something happened in the past has a result now.


    ex: i have broken my leg ( now cant walk)
    how about this one: i broke my leg yesterday, now i cant walk << this is the same meaning.( according to the definition so this sentense mean present perfect ?.... )
    confuse again ...


    and also, if the person broke her leg yesterday, and now she is still injuried.

    if somebody asked me what happened to her, (can i say " she has broken her leg")? because the action is still relerant to the present.


    could somebody hlpe me ? thank you
    Last edited by endeavor6636; 27-Jul-2006 at 08:35.

  2. #2
    DavyBCN's Avatar
    DavyBCN is offline Member
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    Re: present perfect confusion again....

    [QUOTE=endeavor6636]according to the definition: something happened in the past has a result now.


    ex: i have broken my leg ( now cant walk)
    how about this one: i broke my leg yesterday, now i cant walk << this is the same meaning.( according to the definition so this sentense mean present perfect ?.... )
    confuse again ...


    and also, if the person broke her leg yesterday, and now she is still injuried.

    if somebody asked me what happened to her, (can i say " she has broken her leg")? because the action is still relerant to the present.


    Please remember that it is quite normal and grammatically correct to sometimes use different tenses to say the same thing, or to say something with such a small difference in meaning that it is unimportant.

    Both past simple and present perfect are correct in your example. Using the present perfect emphasises what has happened - you have broken your leg - without saying when. Using the past simple adds information on when it happened.

    Yoy quoted a "definition" of the present perfect. I really think it is so important to look at all the different ways the present perfect (and other tenses) are used, instead of a single definition. Think of the present simple tense. A simple "definition" would be that it used for the present, but it is used in past and future times.

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