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  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I like eating raw horse meat????
    Yuk!

    :wink:

  2. infinikyte
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    (I have never heard the expression play safe.)

    :)
    Actually, I did a search in Google and it came up 59,000 results of "play safe". Some of them were extracted from news reports. It seems to me as very common usage. Might it be a shorthand for "play it safe"?

    Upon consulting a dictionary, I found:

    17: behave in a certain way; "play safe," "play it safe";

    WordNet 1.6, 1997 Princeton University

    My original question is raised again.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #13
    Play it safe

    From a Google search:
    • "play it safe" = 66,000
      "play safe" = 25,000
      "play safe"+UK = 5,910
      "play it safe"+UK = 6,420
      "play safe"+USA = 2,650
      "play it safe"+USA = 6,750
      "Let's play safe" = 28
      "Let's play it safe" = 51


    The phrase play safe does seem to be an alternative to play it safe. That seems to be especially true in the UK.

    Miscellaneous returns for play safe:
    • Fun Play, Safe Play
      Play Safe Thong
      play safe be safe!
      PLAY SAFE, PLAY FAIR
      Play Safe Surfacing, Inc.
      Fun Play, Safe Play
      "England plan to play safe" (headline)
      Play Safe in Maryland State Parks
      Sponsor a play safe! be safe! Workshop.
      Play safe (Australia)
      Health Food producers play safe with nuts (UK)
      300 Play Safe Stay Safe Temporary Tattoos


    It does seem likely that a newspaper story with play safe in it is more likely to be in a UK newspaper than it would be in a US newspaper. Perhaps a poll is in order?

    :)

  4. jwschang
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by infinikyte
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    (I have never heard the expression play safe.)

    :)
    Actually, I did a search in Google and it came up 59,000 results of "play safe". Some of them were extracted from news reports. It seems to me as very common usage. Might it be a shorthand for "play it safe"?
    Upon consulting a dictionary, I found:
    17: behave in a certain way; "play safe," "play it safe";
    WordNet 1.6, 1997 Princeton University
    My original question is raised again.
    play safe = act with a (safe) approach = prep + (adj) + noun
    play safe = act with (no) risk = prep + (adj) + noun
    play dumb = act like a (dumb) fellow = prep + (adj) + noun
    play stupid
    play innocent
    all are adjectives.
    english is funny and likes to break the rules. :wink:

    alternatively, one can view it as an adjective born of a noun (since nouns can act as adjectives), because play is both transitive and intransitive, as in: play the fool. :wink:

  5. infinikyte
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    #15
    Thanks Chang.

    Quote Originally Posted by jwschang
    alternatively, one can view it as an adjective born of a noun (since nouns can act as adjectives), because play is both transitive and intransitive, as in: play the fool. :wink:
    This makes me think of another issue: when a noun's acting as an adjective, is it true that it could be used only in the attributive position?

    e.g. I'm an office lady. ("office" as adj. before noun "lady")

    On the other hand, if someone plays basketball as well as Michael Jordan does, does it sound right to say "He's so Michael Jordan."??

  6. jwschang
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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by infinikyte
    Thanks Chang.

    Quote Originally Posted by jwschang
    alternatively, one can view it as an adjective born of a noun (since nouns can act as adjectives), because play is both transitive and intransitive, as in: play the fool. :wink:
    This makes me think of another issue: when a noun's acting as an adjective, is it true that it could be used only in the attributive position?

    e.g. I'm an office lady. ("office" as adj. before noun "lady")

    On the other hand, if someone plays basketball as well as Michael Jordan does, does it sound right to say "He's so Michael Jordan."??
    You're welcome to the bit I know! :wink:
    Adjectives (not just nouns acting as adjectives) can be used predicatively by placing it directly after linking verbs like Be, Became, etc.

    He is young.
    He is English.
    He looks tired.
    He's so Michael Jordan.
    He's fun.
    Other than linking verbs:
    He turned green (with envy).
    That's what I can think of.

  7. RonBee's Avatar
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    #17
    Nouns used in apposition can be said to be acting as adjectives. Example:
    • Mrs. Green, the principal's wife, teaches third grade.


    :)

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