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    • Join Date: Jul 2003
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    #1

    Idiom: Turn over a new leaf, and the "the" article

    Hi Teachers,

    1. "Turn over a new leaf" and "turn a new leaf," are both of these acceptable to mean "changing to a new course?" Both are on the Internet but the former is 10 times more, at 25,000 listings.

    2. Is the new course always better or not necessarily?

    3. This sentence: "My son used to come home black and blue, but since he started the judo lessons, the school bullies havn't touched him." Can I skip the "the" article before judo lessons? What is the significance of it being there?

    Thanks.

    BMO

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Feb 2003
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    #2

    Re: Idiom: Turn over a new leaf, and the "the" art

    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    1. "Turn over a new leaf" and "turn a new leaf," are both of these acceptable to mean "changing to a new course?" Both are on the Internet but the former is 10 times more, at 25,000 listings.
    The expression is turn over a new leaf. I am sure that most people who are familiar with that expression will understand what is meant by turn a new leaf.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    2. Is the new course always better or not necessarily?
    Change, while inevitable, is not always for the better.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    3. This sentence: "My son used to come home black and blue, but since he started the judo lessons, the school bullies havn't touched him." Can I skip the "the" article before judo lessons? What is the significance of it being there?
    In AE, we take lessons. (We also give lessons.) Thus, the sentence would normally read:
    • "My son used to come home black and blue, but since he started taking judo lessons, the school bullies haven't touched him."


    The the in your sentence replaces taking, which would normally be there. I would keep the the for the purpose of euphony, but I consider it optional in that sentence.

    :)


    • Join Date: Jul 2003
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    #3

    Re: Idiom: Turn over a new leaf, and the "the" art

    Great job! Thanks.

    BMO

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