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Thread: it's that

  1. #1
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    Default it's that

    A-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
    -You have been extremely kind to me.
    -It's that I like you.


    B-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
    -He managed to come out first.
    -It's that he works hard.

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: it's that

    Quote Originally Posted by navi
    A-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
    -You have been extremely kind to me.
    -It's that I like you.
    No. Try:
    • That's because I like you.


    Quote Originally Posted by navi
    B-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
    -He managed to come out first.
    -It's that he works hard.
    No. Try:
    • That's because he works hard.

    Or:
    • That's because of his hard work.

    Or:
    • That's because he worked so hard.


    I think the second and third sentences work better than the first one.

    :)

  3. #3
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    Default

    Thanks RonBee.
    I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    Thanks RonBee.
    I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?
    It's because I like you. (OK)
    It's that I like you. (Not OK--in the given context)

    'It's that' means, it's not because of that, it's because of this.

    :D

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    Thanks RonBee.
    I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?
    It's because I like you. (OK)
    It's that I like you. (Not OK--in the given context)

    'It's that' means, it's not because of that, it's because of this.

    :D
    Thanks, Cas!

    :D

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    Thanks RonBee.
    I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?
    I haven't been able to think of a rule, but you have given me something to think about. In the meantime, I suggest using the reason is that or one of the other suggestions. The it's that construction is appropriate sometimes, but context is key. (Perhaps I will do a Google search to find some examples.)

    :)

  7. #7
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    Default

    Here are some examples:
    • Q: Why is Judy not going swimming?
      A: It's that time of the month.

      Q: Why are there so many shoppers in the stores?
      A: It's that time of the year for holiday buying.

      Q: Who is that?
      A: It's that guy we met at the mall.

      Q: Is it really that big?
      A: Yes, it's that big.


    Of course, there are more possibilities if it is not an answer to a question.

    :)

  8. #8
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    Default

    Thanks Casiopea and RonBee.
    It seems to me that Casiopea's explanation is to the point. However, I think that sometimes the "it is not that" sentence may be implied and not stated. Mostly when one wants to say: "It is not that important. It is just that... ", I think one just says the second sentence . " Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?

    For once, I have to disagree with RonBee. With all due respect, your sentences do not seem to me to have the same form as mine. "It is not that I think you are wrong, It is just that you haven't found the good examples." In these sentences there is a verb in the "that" clause.
    "It is not that I know the answer. It is just that i don't think we are talking about the same case."

    Here we have the verbs "know" and "are talking". In "It is that big." and "It is that guy we met in the shopping mall." there are no verbs following the noun that comes after "that".

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    " Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?



    I'd say yes.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    However, I think that sometimes the "it is not that" sentence may be implied and not stated. Mostly when one wants to say: "It is not that important. It is just that... ", I think one just says the second sentence . " Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?
    There's another meaning, too: It's that. I agree; but, it's more so this, than it's that.

    :D

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