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Thread: context

  1. #1
    abrilsp Guest

    Default context

    Hi :)

    I would like to know a possible context for the following sentence:

    "V.S. Naipaul. `In the canon of contemporary British writing he is without peer. Read himí "

    It is difficult for me to figure it out, because of the inverted commas and the dot after the name of the writer. I think can be from a paragraph talking about his writing but I do not understand the punctuation.

    Many thanks,

    abrilsp

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default

    The first "sentence" is a kind of shorthand. The point is to call attention to the person's name. (It works, doesn't it?) I do not know the reason for the punctuation. (More context may or may not help.)

    (Say: "I think it is from a paragraph about his writing....")

    :)

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    The use of inverted commas is a bit strange. The single set make sense as that could be a quote in them, but I can't really see the point of the double ones. As Ron says, context could fill in the gaps, but there is a gap there for me.

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    Default Re: context

    Quote Originally Posted by abrilsp
    "V.S. Naipaul. `In the canon of contemporary British writing he is without peer. Read him’ "
    The underlined portion is a quote within a quote. The context is most likely a review: author's name first, followed by a period followed by a critic's or writer's or professor's opinion. Such opinions are generally found in book reviews or on the outside or inside of the book's cover or jacket. As for the double quoted area ("..."), it seems to me that it may have been taken from a list outlining authors of a given topic or area.

    :D

  5. #5
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    I find "VS Naipul" difficult as a quote- it's a very odd quote.

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    I thought it was probably from a book review also. As for the double quotes, I wasn't sure they were in the original. (Perhaps our original poster will clarify that.) Cas could be right tho. She usually is.

    :wink:

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I find "VS Naipul" difficult as a quote- it's a very odd quote.
    It's not a quote. It's an author's name, which was qouted.

    :D

  8. #8
    abrilsp Guest

    Default

    Hi

    Thanks a lot for the answers.

    I should clarify that the double quotes are my invention, I should have said before, sorry about that

    Again, thanks a lot,

    abrilsp

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by abrilsp
    Hi

    Thanks a lot for the answers.

    I should clarify that the double quotes are my invention, I should have said before, sorry about that

    Again, thanks a lot,

    abrilsp

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