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Thread: j and g

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    j and g

    if any g followed by i,e,oy says j

    then why does get not follow that rule.

    sally-jo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Re: j and g

    Hi, rules are only for general guidance , they don`t always work. There are others ----- girl, gear ,geese,gifted giggle

  3. #3
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    Feb 2006
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    Re: j and g

    There's even at least one case where the "g" says "j" and it's not followed by i, e or y. That word is "margarine".

    The reason for all this is that the English language wasn't invented so it doesn't follow sensible rules: it just sort of evolved, more or less by accident. If you want to learn a really easy language you'll have to make do with something like Esperanto -- and then your next challenge will be to find other people who actually speak it so you can have a conversation.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2005
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    Re: j and g

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    There's even at least one case where the "g" says "j" and it's not followed by i, e or y. That word is "margarine".

    The reason for all this is that the English language wasn't invented so it doesn't follow sensible rules: it just sort of evolved, more or less by accident. If you want to learn a really easy language you'll have to make do with something like Esperanto -- and then your next challenge will be to find other people who actually speak it so you can have a conversation.
    Turkish is very regular and can be understood from Istanbul to China, but yes- English does not have rules, and it is annoying when text books claim otherwise.

  5. #5
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    Feb 2006
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    Re: j and g

    The modern Turkish orthography, based on the Latin alphabet, was introduced in 1928 by Atatürk. Before then, Turkish had used the Arabic alphabet, which wasn't well suited to the Turkish language. In a sense, the modern Turkish alphabet is artificial, but I confidently predict that within a few hundred years, Turkish pronunciation will have altered, and either the language will need a spelling reform or the spelling will seem as irregular as for any language.

    There are rules for English spelling; they're just complicated and have lots of exceptions. Some are more helpful than others. But this is the price you pay for not having regular spelling reforms.

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