Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    matilda Guest

    Talking 201-proverb in linguistics

    Hello all

    What does pro-verb mean in linguistics?
    I need a complete explanation with some example. What is its use?
    Thanks all

    Matilda

  2. #2
    Teia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,885
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: 201-proverb in linguistics

    Quote Originally Posted by matilda View Post
    Hello all
    What does pro-verb mean in linguistics?
    I need a complete explanation with some example. What is its use?
    Thanks all
    Matilda
    Hi, Matilda

    Proverb comes from Latin "proverbium", which is "a common saying"; literally: "pro" [-forth"] + "verbum" {- word];

    proverbium = words put forward

    Many definitions have been attempted of a "proverb", of which none has met universal acceptance.

    Verba volant ,scripta manent.[Latin proverb]- Spoken words fly, written words remain.

    For further information search the following site:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proverb

    Regards,
    Last edited by Teia; 05-Aug-2006 at 15:53.

  3. #3
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: 201-proverb in linguistics

    More simply put, proverbs are words of wisdom that have been quoted and re-quoted over time. Some examples:

    Two heads are better than one.
    Look before you leap.
    Better late than never.

    I personally use that last one quite regularly as I have a problem with arriving at work on time. So I'll shrug and say "well, better late than never" meaning, "I'm here now and can get things done. Would you rather I'd stayed home and then nothing would get done?"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: 201-proverb in linguistics

    I don't think maltilda wants to know about proverbs -- she wants to know about pro-verbs, which are different.

    A pro-verb is like a pronoun, but for verbs and verb phrases, not for nouns. It is a word or construction which takes the place of a verb phrase.

    An example of a pro-verb is "do", as here:

    Peter plays basketball, and so does Jane.

Similar Threads

  1. proverb translation
    By fern in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 18-Nov-2008, 20:26
  2. please I need your help translating this proverb!
    By C00L in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2006, 21:02
  3. Linguistics & Language
    By Raghda in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Mar-2006, 15:56
  4. on or over; a French proverb
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-Jan-2005, 18:01
  5. axiom vs proverb
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2003, 22:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •