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  1. #1
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    Question the opposite to postpone / delay

    It seems that there are many words to express that something happens behind of the fixed time, like

    The meeting is postponed / delayed.

    But, it doesn't seem like that we have any word that says something happens before the fixed time, does it? Please correct me with examples, if I am wrong here. Thanks!

    Emily

  2. #2
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    Hi, you can say ---- the meeting has been brought forward to -----

    This means before the time that had been arranged.

    Tom

  3. #3
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    How about using "advanced"?
    The meeting has been advanced to .....

  4. #4
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    Hi,advanced is not a bad suggestion but it is not what people would say.

    Brought forward is the correct term .

  5. #5
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    Quote Originally Posted by tom slocombe View Post
    Hi,advanced is not a bad suggestion but it is not what people would say.
    Brought forward is the correct term .
    OK. Thank you. :)

  6. #6
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    Smile Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    Hey,
    advanced is the correct dictionary term for the opposite of postpone. However, here in India we used prepone, which is not a legit English word, however the Harvard University has recognised this as a handy word.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    hi, advanced would not usually be used for an event or meeting. If you look up bring forward in a good english dictionary you will see this .

    context is everything

  8. #8
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    Quote Originally Posted by Eternal_AJ View Post
    Hey,
    advanced is the correct dictionary term for the opposite of postpone. However, here in India we used prepone, which is not a legit English word, however the Harvard University has recognised this as a handy word.
    Bring forward is better in the UK and I disagree with the dictionary.
    I think prepone is legit. These people agree:
    http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/drgw004.html

  9. #9
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    Default Re: the opposite to postpone / delay

    Hi, I`ve never heard prepone used in the UK.

    With vocabulary you need to look at collocation , context and usage

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