Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Teia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,885
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: linguistic mistakes committed by politics from countries that english is not firs

    Quote Originally Posted by englishstudent View Post
    I understand your point.
    Though not on the topic of what asad5 has asked,
    don't Australians say "G'day (mate)" just as a greeting? I mean not necessarily when parting/closing a meeting.

    Hi

    Thank you for the additional information provided. I did not know that Australians do use Good day as an usual greeting.


    Regards,

  2. #12
    DavyBCN's Avatar
    DavyBCN is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Wales
      • Current Location:
      • Rwanda
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    346
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: linguistic mistakes committed by politics from countries that english is not firs

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi
    Thank you for the additional information provided. I did not know that Australians do use Good day as an usual greeting.
    Regards,

    Sorry Teia , and everyone else who said the same thing, but Good Day as two words is not normally used at the end of a conversation or meeting, unless it is Teia's abbreviation for the AE "Have a good day".

    Good Day in BE is not used as much as it used to be, and is considered a little formal. At the start of a meeting it is common to hear good morning, good afternoon, hello, etc. There are, of course, many ways of saying good bye (goodbye), bye, etc.

    Have a good day has a little bit of a negative sense in the UK as a phrase which flew over the Atlantic and is often linked to just having received very poor service from a rude assistant in a bad restaurant or shop who then uses the phrase as you leave. Any of our AE friends who feel outraged by this comment, please remember I haven't said whether I agree with this sense.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    438
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: linguistic mistakes committed by politics from countries that english is not firs

    Quote Originally Posted by DavyBCN View Post
    Sorry Teia , and everyone else who said the same thing, but Good Day as two words is not normally used at the end of a conversation or meeting, unless it is Teia's abbreviation for the AE "Have a good day".
    Good Day in BE is not used as much as it used to be, and is considered a little formal. At the start of a meeting it is common to hear good morning, good afternoon, hello, etc. There are, of course, many ways of saying good bye (goodbye), bye, etc.
    Have a good day has a little bit of a negative sense in the UK as a phrase which flew over the Atlantic and is often linked to just having received very poor service from a rude assistant in a bad restaurant or shop who then uses the phrase as you leave. Any of our AE friends who feel outraged by this comment, please remember I haven't said whether I agree with this sense.
    Davy, ah, I see you are practising diplomacy. ;) ;)

    Thanks for the clarification and information. I am assuming that
    "Have a good day" is said in a particular tone to give that sense.
    Perhaps I am wrong, and maybe only the words do the trick.
    In the US, around Christmas time I have heard rude people (people not
    unlike what you have mentioned above, giving bad service)
    say "Have a Merry Christmas" in a particular tone which tells
    you that they don't mean it, and it sounds kind of ugly, and I have heard the other person respond "Merry Christmas to YOU too" in a similar tone. You can guess which invectives they must be exchanging.
    But I have often heard people pleasantly saying
    "Have a nice day" and in response getting - "You too".
    I have seen "Have a nice day" even in office emails.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    438
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: linguistic mistakes committed by politics from countries that english is not firs

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi
    Thank you for the additional information provided. I did not know that Australians do use Good day as an usual greeting.
    Regards,
    Teia, "G'day" or "G'day mate" is "hello" in Australia(n).
    http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html

    You may find this interesting:
    http://www.moxon.net/australia/austr...greetings.html
    It is a short article by a travel writer on how people from different cultures
    (American, British, Australian) interact and greet in everyday
    situations.

    Have a nice day! :)

  5. #15
    Teia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,885
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: linguistic mistakes committed by politics from countries that english is not first L

    Hi

    Thank you both Davy and Englishstudent.

    Your messages are very interesting and full of detailed explanations.

    Have a nice evening ! [ By the way :is it common to say "have a nice night" when one is not going to bed but [is going ]to have a party?

    Thank you again.

    Teia

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: linguistic mistakes committed by politics from countries that english is not first L

    Yes it is. But you'd probably not be far off if you wished them a "fun night" or a "great night" for instance.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. Help
    By zhangjin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2008, 20:47
  2. Seminar
    By mallikatweety in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Jun-2006, 12:07
  3. Is it right?
    By Genrikh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-Dec-2005, 16:59
  4. Please check for grammar mistakes, thanks.
    By M.Ali in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Feb-2005, 06:44

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •