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  1. #1
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    two small questions:)

    1.Tell the "DA" that I'll meet with him next week to discuss the details.
    I don't know what "DA"stand for in the sentence? Department of the Army? To answer this question, I think you need to read the following story,thanks for your time!
    2.When you try to impress others you’ll make a mess. Be yourself always in all-ways.
    in all-ways means in any situation?

    The story:
    Big Man in a Small Town
    Bill grew up in a small town, then moved away to attend college and law school. He decided to come back to the small town because he could be a big man in this small town. He really wanted to impress everyone. So he returned and opened his new law office.
    The first day, he saw a man coming up the sidewalk. He decided to make a big impression on this new client when he arrived. As the man came to the door, Bill picked up the phone. He let the man in, all while talking on the phone.
    "No. Absolutely not! You tell those clowns in New York that I won't settle this case for less than one million. Yes. Tell the "DA" that I'll meet with him next week to discuss the details."
    This sort of thing went on for almost five minutes. All the while the man sat patiently as Bill rattled instructions. Finally, Bill put down the phone and turned to the man.
    "I'm sorry for the delay, but as you can see, I'm very busy. What can I do for you?"
    The man replied, "I'm from the Phone Company. I came to hook up your telephone.
    The moral of this story: “When you try to impress others you’ll make a mess. Be yourself always in all-ways”.

  2. #2
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    Re: two small questions:)

    1. DA = District Attorney. He/she is the lawyer (attorney) employed by
    the district to prosecute. You can think of him/her as the lawyer
    of the government to prosecute.

    2. Yes, you can think of it as "in all situations". In other words,
    don't pretend to be what you are not (for example, don't pretend
    that you are an expert, or don't act differently with the intention
    of trying to impress others).


    I am curious to know the equivalent term for DA that is used in UK. Thanks

  3. #3
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Quote Originally Posted by englishstudent View Post
    1. DA = District Attorney. He/she is the lawyer (attorney) employed by
    the district to prosecute. You can think of him/her as the lawyer
    of the government to prosecute.
    2. Yes, you can think of it as "in all situations". In other words,
    don't pretend to be what you are not (for example, don't pretend
    that you are an expert, or don't act differently with the intention
    of trying to impress others).
    I am curious to know the equivalent term for DA that is used in UK. Thanks
    Hi , In the UK we don`t have a single person responsible for bringing a prosecution. It is a government organisation called The C.P.S ( The Crown Prosecution Service) which decides whether to prosecute or not and they employ a Barrister to prosecute the case. In Scotland the system is different and they have an individual called The Procurator Fiscal who is the public prosecutor.

    Tom

  4. #4
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Quote Originally Posted by tom slocombe View Post
    Hi , In the UK we don`t have a single person responsible for bringing a prosecution. It is a government organisation called The C.P.S ( The Crown Prosecution Service) which decides whether to prosecute or not and they employ a Barrister to prosecute the case. In Scotland the system is different and they have an individual called The Procurator Fiscal who is the public prosecutor.
    Tom
    Thank you Tom. I am happy to know
    the extra piece of information about Scotland.

    Is the word "lawyer" or "advocate"
    used at all or do people just use "barrister"?

    In the US, an attorney is also referred
    to as a "counselor". In the movies
    or TV serials about law, I hear attorneys
    being addressed as "Counselor, ....".
    How do people address a lawyer or a barrister in the UK?

    So far I have only come across "fiscal"
    in the context of finance/money, so it is
    interesting to know that it is also used
    in the title related to law as you mentioned above.
    No offense meant to any Scotts or Procurator
    Fiscals on this board, if any, but it sounds weird,
    complicated, or even pompous. ;)

  5. #5
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Quote Originally Posted by englishstudent View Post
    Thank you Tom. I am happy to know
    the extra piece of information about Scotland.
    Is the word "lawyer" or "advocate"
    used at all or do people just use "barrister"?
    In the US, an attorney is also referred
    to as a "counselor". In the movies
    or TV serials about law, I hear attorneys
    being addressed as "Counselor, ....".
    How do people address a lawyer or a barrister in the UK?
    So far I have only come across "fiscal"
    in the context of finance/money, so it is
    interesting to know that it is also used
    in the title related to law as you mentioned above.
    No offense meant to any Scotts or Procurator
    Fiscals on this board, if any, but it sounds weird,
    complicated, or even pompous. ;)
    The term Procurator Fiscal would almost certainly have originally meant an officer associated with the collection ('procurement') of money. It is an old medieval term.

  6. #6
    DavyBCN's Avatar
    DavyBCN is offline Member
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      • English Teacher
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Quote Originally Posted by englishstudent View Post
    Thank you Tom. I am happy to know
    the extra piece of information about Scotland.
    Is the word "lawyer" or "advocate"
    used at all or do people just use "barrister"?
    In the US, an attorney is also referred
    to as a "counselor". In the movies
    or TV serials about law, I hear attorneys
    being addressed as "Counselor, ....".
    How do people address a lawyer or a barrister in the UK?
    So far I have only come across "fiscal"
    in the context of finance/money, so it is
    interesting to know that it is also used
    in the title related to law as you mentioned above.
    No offense meant to any Scotts or Procurator
    Fiscals on this board, if any, but it sounds weird,
    complicated, or even pompous. ;)

    Lawyer is widely used in all parts of the UK. Advocate is, I believe, used only in Scotland, but it is beginning to be used in a wider sense for people who "act on behalf of" or "speak for" other people in a lot of quasi-legal situations such as public inquiries.

    Lawyer is a general name in the UK excluding Scotland where, as has been said, the legal system has major differences. Everything in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is complicated by the fact that there is a sort of hierarchy in the legal system. If you have a legal problem, civil or criminal, you normally approach a solicitor. A solicitor deals in a wide range of legal matters, from house purchase contracts to defending you in court on lesser criminal offences.

    If you have a more serious legal problem, you will also need a barrister, who will represent you in court. At an even higher level there are barristers called Queen's Council, who get paid an awfull lot of money!

    Counselor is not used in a legal sense in the UK as far as I know. Confused? Just don't ask me about the different levels of courts here! I will be happy to do so, but maybe someone else can explain better.

  7. #7
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Hi, In an english court barristers are referred to as ----

    a) The Counsel for the Prosecution
    b) The Counsel for the Defence ( Defence counsel)

  8. #8
    DavyBCN's Avatar
    DavyBCN is offline Member
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Quote Originally Posted by tom slocombe View Post
    Hi, In an english court barristers are referred to as ----
    a) The Counsel for the Prosecution
    b) The Counsel for the Defence ( Defence counsel)
    I stand well corrected. I have lived such an unblemished life

  9. #9
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Thank you Davy for the detailed response.
    I appreciate it.

    I hope I am not annoying people with
    my inquisitiveness.

    --

    "Of course, some would say if you have a performing inclination, then you should become a lawyer. That's a platform we use, or a priest. You know, anywhere you lecture and pontificate to people." - Rowan Atkinson

  10. #10
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    Re: two small questions:)

    Quote Originally Posted by DavyBCN View Post
    I stand well corrected. I have lived such an unblemished life

    What can I say to defend myself ?

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