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  1. #1
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    Default "grant someone" or "grant to someone"?

    I often read computer related business ageements between companies.
    In these agreements, I notice that there are two ways in using a verb "grant".
    One is "A company grants B company" and the other is "A company grants to B company".
    I wonder, if both usages are correct or one is mistakenly used.
    I have encountered both expressions in many cases so I guess both usages are correct. But then I wonder if there is any rules or preferences in using the verb "grant".

    Thank you for your attention in advance.

  2. #2
    Reemy's Avatar
    Reemy is offline Member
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    Default Re: "grant someone" or "grant to someone"?

    Hi,

    Both usages are correct, you can say " the bank grants me a $500 loan."
    and
    "The bank grants a $500 loan to me."
    so in your case the company A grants B...or grants to B.....is correct

    All the best,
    Reemy

  3. #3
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    Default Re: "grant someone" or "grant to someone"?

    Hi Reemy-san,

    Thank you for your explanation.
    I understand the both usages, "The bank grants me a $500 loan." and "The bank grants a $500 loan to me.".

    The expressions I encountered were like "ABC company grants XYZ company to use ABC's software." and "ABC company grants to XYZ company to use ABC's software.". And I doubt that the latter sentence is something wrong or different from "The bank grants a $500 loan to me." format because there is no object between "grants" and "to XYZ".

    So, my question again is that is "grant to someone", i.e. without object between "grant" and "to someone" OK?

    Regards,

    Akabane

  4. #4
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    Default Re: "grant someone" or "grant to someone"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akabane View Post
    Hi Reemy-san,

    Thank you for your explanation.
    I understand the both usages, "The bank grants me a $500 loan." and "The bank grants a $500 loan to me.".

    The expressions I encountered were like "ABC company grants XYZ company to use ABC's software." and "ABC company grants to XYZ company to use ABC's software.". And I doubt that the latter sentence is something wrong or different from "The bank grants a $500 loan to me." format because there is no object between "grants" and "to XYZ".

    So, my question again is that is "grant to someone", i.e. without object between "grant" and "to someone" OK?

    Regards,

    Akabane
    Your query is essentially whether the direct object of the verb 'to grant' needs to directly follow the verb. It does not - 'grant' requires a direct object ('x') and a dative object (to 'y'), but they may be in either order. For example:

    1) "I grant (to) you the right..."
    2) "I grant the right... to you."

    In both cases, 'you' is the dative object y, and 'the right' is the direct object x. However, in both of your original examples 'B company' is the dative object - you simply illustrated that the dative preposition 'to' is optional there (directly after the verb - it is not optional later in the sentence).

    Reemy's example was different, in that he/she transposed the two objects. To reiterate, they are all correct, both grammatically and in common usage.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: "grant someone" or "grant to someone"?

    Hi Coffa-san,

    Can I understand that in 1) case both "I grant you the right" and "I grant to you the right" are gramatically correct?

    Regards,

    Akabane

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