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Thread: get or be?

  1. #1
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    get or be?

    Hello guys,

    Just wanna ask about these two sentences:

    1. Please escalate the problem if the issue will not get resolved.
    2. Please escalate the problem if the issue will not be resolved.

    Are these sentences correct? If so, what is their difference? If not, please point out to me the correct one.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    Re: get or be?

    .
    Well first, neither sentence makes sense to me.

    However, get is a verb of action, and often = become; be is a verb of condition or state. These distinctions apply here.
    .

  3. #3
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Re: get or be?

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    Hello guys,

    Just wanna ask about these two sentences:

    1. Please escalate the problem if the issue will not get resolved.
    2. Please escalate the problem if the issue will not be resolved.

    We normally don't collocate 'if' and 'will' like this. These,

    1. Please escalate the problem if the issue does not get resolved.
    2. Please escalate the problem if the issue is not resolved.

    sound more natural, though 'escalate the problem' doesn't sound much like native English.



    Are these sentences correct? If so, what is their difference? If not, please point out to me the correct one.

    Thanks.
    xxx

  4. #4
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    Re: get or be?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    though 'escalate the problem' doesn't sound much like native English.
    I beg to differ, Riverkid.
    Saying 'escalate the problem/issue' is quite typical in a business context.
    .

  5. #5
    Jaguar is offline Junior Member
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    Re: get or be?

    Smells like business lingo........



    'doesn't get resolved' sounds alright to me without getting to............technical.



    I don't like how 'will not' sounds. That's just the way it is.



    Jag

  6. #6
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    Re: get or be?

    Hi Jaguar

    I agree 100% with you and Riverkid about removing will from the sentence.

    My disagreement was only with Riverkid's comment about 'escalate the problem'. Saying "escalate a problem" does have a certain logic to it. The problem is in fact "intensified" or "made more serious" (escalated) in the sense that it is sent up the corporate ladder to a more important person (e.g., the boss) if a solution can't be found using the standard process. The higher the problem has to go before being resolved, the more serious it becomes.
    .

  7. #7
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Re: get or be?

    I stand corrected. That particular business collocation has been, up to now, off my radar. Thanks, Philly.

  8. #8
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    Re: get or be?

    .
    'escalate the problem'....-- The problem is in fact "intensified" or "made more serious" (escalated) in the sense that it is sent up the corporate ladder to a more important person (e.g., the boss) if a solution can't be found using the standard process.
    Can you give us an online reference (e.g. a biz glossary) that offers this as a definition of escalate, Philly?
    .

  9. #9
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    Re: get or be?

    Hi MM
    .
    Here's one online reference:
    http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/re...lossary_e.html

    I worked in business for 12 years before "turning into" a teacher and to me this usage of escalate is as "run-of-the-mill" in companies as using the word issue instead of problem. I'd say I've been hearing and reading this usage (in various companies --- not just one) for a good 20 years and that over the years the usage itself has also been escalating.
    .

  10. #10
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    Re: get or be?

    .
    VERY nice glossary indeed, Philly! I have it firmly bookmarked. Just the first of the As that caught my fancy:


    administrivia n. Any kind of bureaucratic red tape or paperwork, IBM or not, that hinders the accomplishment of one's objectives or goals. Often, anything with a routing or buck slip (see) attached.
    .

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