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Thread: From or of


    • Join Date: Feb 2003
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    #1

    From or of

    Hi, can you give me a way to explain the difference between from and of? In Dutch, both are translated by "van". I know the difference, but how to expalin it. I had a letter from one of my "students" telling me she was "back of holiday" I see of as belonging to, and from as in leaving from, but is there a better expalnation please?

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    #2
    For some reason this message got lost in the system. Sorry Val.
    I'm not a teacher, so please consider any advice I give in that context.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3
    I would say that from has more to do with movement or a sense of direction than of does.

    Perhaps somebody else will come up with a better explanation.

    (I saw this one a few days ago, but I left it for Tdol.)

    :)

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    #4
    I already replied to this- it must be a duplicate post.

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