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  1. #1
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    Default "bust (someone's) chops"

    Hi,

    I looked up the meaning of "bust (someone's) chops"
    in the link posted by Casiopea (Thanks Casiopea).

    Here is what it says:

    Idiom:
    bust (someone's) chops
    1. To scold or insult someone.
    2. To disappoint or defeat someone.
    3. To hold a building contractor to the letter of an agreement.

    If it really means "to hold a building contractor to the letter of an agreement",
    I wonder how one would use the idiom. I am familiar with "don't bust
    my chops
    ", but I am don't know how to use #3 above in a sentence.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "bust (someone's) chops"

    I think they mean to hold someone accountable for the smallest degree of detail in an agreement.

    "You were supposed to have this done by noon."

    "Don't bust my chops, it's 12:03."

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up Re: "bust (someone's) chops"

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    I think they mean to hold someone accountable for the smallest degree of detail in an agreement.
    "You were supposed to have this done by noon."
    "Don't bust my chops, it's 12:03."
    OK. I see. Thanks mykwyner. The person saying "You were
    supposed to have this done by noon" is the one busting the
    chops (ie holding the other person responsible).

    The Italian slang "non me rompere palle" is what the contractor
    would use in response, if the contractor happens to be an Italian. ;)

    Thanks
    Last edited by englishstudent; 02-Sep-2006 at 17:47. Reason: Changed sentence for clarity.

  4. #4
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "bust (someone's) chops"

    You've got it.

  5. #5
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: "bust (someone's) chops"

    Quote Originally Posted by englishstudent View Post
    Hi,
    I looked up the meaning of "bust (someone's) chops"
    in the link posted by Casiopea (Thanks Casiopea).
    Here is what it says:
    Idiom:
    bust (someone's) chops
    3. To hold a building contractor to the letter of an agreement.
    If it really means "to hold a building contractor to the letter of an agreement",
    I wonder how one would use the idiom. I am familiar with "don't bust
    my chops
    ", but I am don't know how to use #3 above in a sentence.
    Thanks
    I don't think that the #3 defintion belongs under this heading. As Mykwyner noted, it's a possible response, but has the meaning ever been specific to building contractors. Something seems fishy.

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