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  1. #1
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    Default Translating Idioms

    Hi please can somebody tell me what is analogue translation of idioms as well as antonimic one. I could understand examples in English, Bulgarian and Spanish.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Translating Idioms

    You can translate verbatim, exactly or word for word, but an analagous translation of an idiom, would look for a idiom in the target language with a similar meaning or a way of expressing the idea.

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    Default Re: Translating Idioms

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    You can translate verbatim, exactly or word for word, but an analagous translation of an idiom, would look for a idiom in the target language with a similar meaning or a way of expressing the idea.
    This is usually can relate to the culture...

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    Default Re: Translating Idioms

    As far as possible.

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    Default Re: Translating Idioms

    Idioms are sometimes devilishly hard to translate.

    There's a piece of dialogue in an old sitcom involving the manager of an old people's home, Harvey, and his secretary, Jane. Jane is always trying to impress Harvey, but he always ignores her. In one scene, she says something that sounds like garbage...

    Harvey: What did you say?
    Jane: It's Korean. It means, "Your mother must have slept with a tiger".
    Harvey: I will not tolerate these disgusting rumours about my mother, do you understand?
    Jane: Oh no, it's just a figure of speech! It's means you are so strong and masterful.

    Jane's attempt at translating the idiom failed because it has no meaning in English, except for the literal meaning. Harvey thus misunderstood her and was suitably horrified.

    An antonymic translation, just to clear this one up, is not a word-for-word translation. It is a type of transformation where a positive sentence is translated by a negative sentence, or vice-versa. For example (a random example I found on the internet), take the Russian sentence:

    Nye dyerzhitye rebyonka na solntse.

    Literally translated, this would be:

    Do not keep the child in the sun.

    But that is not how we normally say it in English. A better translation would be:

    Keep your child out of the sun.

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    Default Re: Translating Idioms

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    An antonymic translation, just to clear this one up, is not a word-for-word translation. It is a type of transformation where a positive sentence is translated by a negative sentence, or vice-versa. For example (a random example I found on the internet), take the Russian sentence:

    Nye dyerzhitye rebyonka na solntse.

    Literally translated, this would be:

    Do not keep the child in the sun.

    But that is not how we normally say it in English. A better translation would be:

    Keep your child out of the sun.


    antonymic translation can be tricky too...

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