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    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #1

    Time Prepositions

    Hi,

    I don't understand that why my answers are incorrect in this.

    Question #: 7: He was famous in the sixties. This sentence is incorrect
    User's answer: True
    Correct answer: False
    Additional Notes:

    Question #: 9: The bank is open between 9 o'clock to five o'clock. This sentence is correct.
    User's answer: True
    Correct answer: False
    Additional Notes:


    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #2

    Re: Time Prepositions

    Hi bsimsek
    .
    Question 7:
    When talking about time, the preposition in is used with a period of time. "The sixties" is a period of ten years. You'd also say in March, in 2004, etc. (Generally speaking, you'd use at to refer to a specific time of day and you'd use on to talk about one specific day/date.)
    .
    Question 9:
    - between X and Y
    - from X to Y
    .


    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #3

    Re: Time Prepositions

    Thank you Philly, I understand.

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    #4

    Re: Time Prepositions

    "Between x and y time" means "any time during those hours."

    I'll be at your house between 8 and 9 tonight. This means I'll arrive at your house at some point within that hour. We don't know when I'll leave.

    I'll be at your house from 8 to 9 tonight. This means I'll arrive at 8 and leave at 9.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #5

    Re: Time Prepositions

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    "Between x and y time" means "any time during those hours."
    I'll be at your house between 8 and 9 tonight. This means I'll arrive at your house at some point within that hour. We don't know when I'll leave.
    I'll be at your house from 8 to 9 tonight. This means I'll arrive at 8 and leave at 9.
    That's true, but in informal speech you might often hear (in Br.E anyway):

    "I'll be at your house (any time) from 8 to 9 tonight."

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