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  1. #1
    Mad-ox's Avatar
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    literary periods



    I want to clarify my thoughts about English literary periods.

    1837-1901 Victorian age
    1914-1945 Modernist period
    1945-present (and here is my question) Postmodernist or Contemporary period?

    Is there a difference between postmodernist and contemporary? Or are they one and the same?

    madox

  2. #2
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: literary periods

    Hello Mad-ox

    I would call post-1945 literature "contemporary", and describe some of the works produced during that period as "post-modernist".

    Thus (to my mind) the poems of Larkin are "contemporary"; but the later stories of Borges or Calvino are both "contemporary" and "post-modern".

    By the way, you could also add the Edwardian (1901-1910) and Georgian periods (1910-1914).

    (Of course, these periods are only for convenience: "Victorian" authors continued to write in a Victorian style into the early years of the 20th century, and Georgian writers continued to Georgianize into the 1920s.)

    All the best,

    MrP

  3. #3
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    Re: literary periods



    Thanks MrP,

    Can you mention me some (very) important novelists in Edwardian or Georgian periods? In fact are there relevant writers in these two periods?


    best wishes

    madox

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    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: literary periods

    Hello Mad-ox

    Here are a few characteristic works, out of the very many that could be listed.

    To some extent, the poetry of the period is more "Edwardian" and "Georgian" than the prose, so I've included a few poets too.

    I've marked with an asterisk the ones which I myself would read first; though other posters would probably disagree!

    Edwardian
    Poets
    Belloc; De la Mare; Flecker; Hardy*; Kipling; Newbolt; Masefield; Bridges.

    Prose
    Beerbohm: Zuleika Dobson; Essays*
    Bennett: Old Wives' Tale
    Butler: Way of All Flesh
    Chesterfield: Man Who Was Thursday
    Forster: Howard's End; Longest Journey; Room with a View; Where Angels Fear to Tread
    Galsworthy: Man of Property
    Grahame: Wind in the Willows
    Kipling: Kim; Traffics and Discoveries*

    Georgian
    Poets
    Brooke; Davies; Graves (early poems); Lawrence (early poems); Pound (early poems); Sassoon.

    Other significant works 1900-1914 (American or early Modernist)
    Conrad: Nostromo*; Secret Agent
    James, H: Ambassadors; Wings of the Dove
    Joyce: Dubliners*
    Lawrence: Sons and Lovers
    Synge: Playboy of the Western World*
    Wharton: House of Mirth
    Yeats: various plays*; poems*

    MrP

  5. #5
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    Re: literary periods

    hi again,

    Thank you for your detailed answer.

    Where would you put Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness


    best wishes,
    madox

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    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: literary periods

    I forgot about Heart of Darkness.

    I think it first appeared in 1899. I would call it "early modernist": although Conrad's writing is technically fairly traditional, his presentation of character and narrative has modernistic leanings. (And I would certainly give H. of D. an asterisk.)

    To fill in another gap:

    The period from c. 1885 to c. 1900 is sometimes called the "Decadent" period, or simply "the 90s".

    Writers of this period included the minor poets Dowson, Symons, Davidson, and Lionel Johnson, and fiction-writers such as Egerton, Crackanthorpe, and George Moore. Yeats, Bennett, and Wilde were also associated with this group; Beardsley represents the pictorial element. Many of their short stories and poems appeared in a magazine called The Yellow Book. Their works were influenced by the poetry of Swinburne and the French Symbolists (Laforgue, Rimbaud, Verlaine, etc.) and the fiction of Gautier and Maupassant. Philosophically, they owe much to Walter Pater, and especially to his writings on the Renaissance.

    Although their writings are now not generally well known, except for a few anthology pieces, they had a great deal of influence on later modernist writers, such as T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound.

    In terms of literary technique, the "decadent" writers are not strictly speaking modernistic writers. But in terms of subject matter (sexual and psychological intricacies, etc.), they prefigure the modernists. So it's possible to think of them as "honorary early modernists".

    (Once again, literary periods are only a convenient rough guide, of course. There's a great deal of spillage.)

    MrP

    PS: I forgot to mention the poet Edward Thomas, among the Georgians.

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    Batfink is offline Member
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    Re: literary periods

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post

    Other significant works 1900-1914 (American or early Modernist)
    Conrad: Nostromo*; Secret Agent
    James, H: Ambassadors; Wings of the Dove
    Joyce: Dubliners*
    Lawrence: Sons and Lovers
    Synge: Playboy of the Western World*
    Wharton: House of Mirth
    Yeats: various plays*; poems*

    MrP
    Three of these are Irish!!! The greatest writers of English.

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    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: literary periods

    Quote Originally Posted by Batfink View Post
    Three of these are Irish!!! The greatest writers of English.
    I should have mentioned a very interesting book about the Irish writers of that period: A Colder Eye, by Hugh Kenner.

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  9. #9
    mirage@ is offline Newbie
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    can u give me information about latin and its influences?

    please give me some imformations about latin language and its influences on middle english.
    thanks for your interests.

  10. #10
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: literary periods

    Hello Mirage,

    That's quite a big subject. Is there a particular aspect of the influence of Latin on Middle English that interests you?

    Best wishes,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

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