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    #1

    "Let's go for a walk"

    "Let's go for a walk"

    Is it a common phrase in the USA?
    I mean, when you want your companion to take walk a round
    with you is it ok to say that?
    Someone told me that it sounds kind of old fashion.


    Thanks,


    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #2

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    It sounds perfectly acceptable to me (though I'm from England, not the U.S.A.). You could simply say "Let's go out" if others agree "Let's go for a walk" sounds a little old fashioned.


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    #3

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Thanks Robbie.

    That's exactly what I was told. Instead of saying " Let's go for a walk"
    I should say "Let's go out".

  1. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Shall we go out? or I hope you don't mind going out.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Quote Originally Posted by veter View Post
    Thanks Robbie.

    That's exactly what I was told. Instead of saying " Let's go for a walk"
    I should say "Let's go out".

    Or you could give a vague direction: "Lets go round the block". If you really want to sound old-fashioned, "Let's take a turn around the grounds"

    b

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    #6

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    what about "let's have a walk'


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    #7

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Hi veter
    .
    There's nothing wrong with saying "Let's go for a walk". You might also say "(Do you) Feel like taking a walk?"
    .
    Saying "Let's go out" could mean a number of things. I'm from the US and if someone said "Let's go out" to me, I definitely would not automatically understand "for a walk".
    .


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    #8

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    I believe Philly is saying that "let's go out" usually signifies dating romantically in AmE. Use it with caution.

    "Let's go for a walk" is perfectly ok. It's exactly what I would use if I were sitting with a friend in the college library and had decided that we needed a break from studying.

    On the other hand..
    If I were with someone who must command more respect, I would ask..
    "would you like/care to go for a walk?"
    (Imagine sitting with your girlfriend's parents or with a respected elder)

    Neither of the above sounds old-fashioned at all. They are clear and concise. Since "let's go for a walk" very often just means you wish to leave the place, I'll include some more ways to say that. There is the very common..
    "let's get out of here." It could be a little vulgar unless you are with very close friends, but it is very common.

    It only gets worse from here. "Let's bolt". "let's hit the road." "let's boogie."
    (another ironic sarcasm from the seventies). In my parent's time it was "let's scram" or "let's skidattle". There are surely as many varients in any language you choose. When I was in high school in the seventies it was "let's book." If you want to get a genuine laugh out of a native AmE speaker in his forties, you might try that one some time.

    One more seemingly innocent construction you'd like to avoid is..
    "would you like to step outside"?
    Here you would be inviting someone to a fistfight!
    Last edited by wsemajb; 30-Sep-2006 at 04:39.

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    #9

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    [quote=veter;116369]Thanks Robbie.

    That's exactly what I was told. Instead of saying " Let's go for a walk"
    I should say "Let's go out".[/quote
    for suggestions we can use: why don't we go out.?
    what about going out??
    would you like to go out??
    all of them can be accepted?


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    #10

    Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Wait, wait, wait!! Do not pass go - do not collect 200 dollars!!

    Do not say "let's go out"

    Worse, do not say "why don't we go out" (simpering)

    or "what about going out" (oblique and suspicious? indecisive?)


    These expressions do suggest something romantic. At least so in AmE.

    Unless I've completely misapprehended this thread. Are we talking about dating here?

    (i'm new here, so if i sometimes seem a bit presumtious, i apologize. i realize that the english-speaking community should not feel compelled to conform to ame usage. but so many questions in the forum seem directed specifically to british, u.s., or other usage, that i naturally enthuse upon my own. all bias aside, the effectiveness of a forum like this one rests on a respect for practicality above all else. what is going to make you most clearly understood in the circumstances in which you expect to find yourself? this might be a good topic to take up in the neighboring thread "what is the role of the english language in our world today?" linguistic patriotism is jingoism plain and truly. it's tragically ironic that language, the most extraordinary bridge that humans have yet developed for communicating with their kind, could be stood upon by something as suffocating as national pride. i'm personally ashamed by my lack of ease with other languages. i'm selfishly happy that english has gained such wide usage. it's a benefit to me. i'm proud of its heritage, but always reminding myself that others have as much reason to be proud of their own. why has english spread so? is it really more flexible/adaptible than most? accident of history/geography? are other languages poised to become more widespread? are some professions/arts so dominated by certain languages that entry into them becomes exclusive? what the heck ever happened to esperanto?)
    Last edited by wsemajb; 30-Sep-2006 at 04:51.

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