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  1. #11
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Hi
    .
    I agree with wsemajb. "Let's go out" suggests the following possibilities to me (for example):
    .
    - "Let's go (out) on a date."
    - "Let's go (out) dancing."
    - "Let's go (out) to a movie."
    - "Let's go out to dinner."
    .
    The idea of "Let's go (out) for a walk" would not even make it to my initial "short list" of possible interpretations at all.
    .
    If the question is about American English, then I have to say that "Let's go out" does not mean the same thing as "Let's go for a walk."
    .

  2. #12
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi
    .
    I agree with wsemajb. "Let's go out" suggests the following possibilities to me (for example):
    .
    - "Let's go (out) on a date."
    - "Let's go (out) dancing."
    - "Let's go (out) to a movie."
    - "Let's go out to dinner."
    .
    The idea of "Let's go (out) for a walk" would not even make it to my initial "short list" of possible interpretations at all.
    .
    If the question is about American English, then I have to say that "Let's go out" does not mean the same thing as "Let's go for a walk."
    .
    Just to clarify (because I've actually made this mistake ):

    In AmE, "Let's go out" means the same thing as "Let's go out together" in BrE (and in AmE too, I assume). It's an invitation to a romantic date.

    BrE speakers mean completely different things by:
    1) "Would you like to go out?"
    and
    2) "Would you like to go out with me?"

    It appears that in AmE, 1) also means the same as 2).

    Incidentally, the traditional polite term for a man and a woman seeing each other romantically was that they were 'walking out'. For example: "I see John is walking out with Jane these days." And you thought you were confused before .

    Back to the question...

    I would say: "Fancy a walk?"

    Could our American friends comment on how that would sound?

  3. #13
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    And I'd probably say "I'm going to get a breath of fresh air. Coming?"

    How would this go down among AmE speakers?

    b

  4. #14
    Philly is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    .
    Yes, Bob, the "breath of fresh air" might suggest a walk in the US, too.
    .
    "Fancy a walk?" --> I think this would be understood but not used in the US. "Feel like a walk?" is the likely US equivalent.
    .

  5. #15
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Quote Originally Posted by veter View Post
    "Let's go for a walk"

    Is it a common phrase in the USA?
    I mean, when you want your companion to take walk a round
    with you is it ok to say that?
    Someone told me that it sounds kind of old fashion.


    Thanks,
    There is nothing old-fashioned about that.

  6. #16
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    And I'd probably say "I'm going to get a breath of fresh air. Coming?"

    How would this go down among AmE speakers?

    b
    That would be fine and common in the US.

  7. #17
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Let's go for a walk"

    Back to the question...

    I would say: "Fancy a walk?"

    Could our American friends comment on how that would sound?

    That would be understood in AE, but not commonly used by AE speakers.

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