Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: take a pick

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    189
    Post Thanks / Like

    Arrow take a pick

    (1) What does it mean when one says " I have taken my pick, you take yours". (2) How the word hyphenatew is used as a verb and what does it mean.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,689
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: take a pick

    'take <possessive> pick' is to make a selection. I can't think of a context where one would say 'take a pick'.

    to hyphenate is to add a hyphen ('-'), often at then end of a typed line:

    "At the end of a line that is longer than the width available, it is sometimes necessary to hyphen-
    ate."

    b

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    189
    Post Thanks / Like

    Red face Re: take a pick

    (1)the literal meaning of "take a (one's) pick" is obvious. But what is the idiomatic or metaphoric meaning. (2) literal meaning "Hyphenate" is to join, agreed. But what will it mean metaphorically if one says "the two countries are hyphenated due to the United States." Here also the obvious meaning is the twocountries are "Joined" together. But my doubt arose because it was in the context of India and Pakistan relations. I cannot reproduce the exact sentence now,but it did not convey the meaning of "Joining". I wonder if there is some other measning of the word.

  4. #4
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    15,314
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: take a pick

    Quote Originally Posted by rameshpahwa View Post
    (1)the literal meaning of "take a (one's) pick" is obvious. But what is the idiomatic or metaphoric meaning. (2) literal meaning "Hyphenate" is to join, agreed. But what will it mean metaphorically if one says "the two countries are hyphenated due to the United States." Here also the obvious meaning is the twocountries are "Joined" together. But my doubt arose because it was in the context of India and Pakistan relations. I cannot reproduce the exact sentence now,but it did not convey the meaning of "Joining". I wonder if there is some other measning of the word.
    The phrase "take your pick" can mean "either option is the same for me".
    It is similar to "six of one, half dozen of another".

    Why didn't John notice that he was stealing form the company?

    John is either stupid or blind. Take your pick.

    I have never heard that use of "hyphenate".

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,689
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: take a pick

    Quote Originally Posted by rameshpahwa View Post
    .
    .
    ..
    (2) literal meaning "Hyphenate" is to join, agreed. But what will it mean metaphorically if one says "the two countries are hyphenated due to the United States." Here also the obvious meaning is the twocountries are "Joined" together. But my doubt arose because it was in the context of India and Pakistan relations. I cannot reproduce the exact sentence now,but it did not convey the meaning of "Joining". I wonder if there is some other measning of the word.
    I remember a broadcast by Alastair (I?) Cooke about 3 or four years ago in which he used the expression "hyphenated Americans" to refer to people who claimed allegiance to America but modified the expression with their (real or mythologized) provenance: 'Italian-Americans', 'Afro-Americans' and so on. I wonder if this usage could be relevant?

    (I assumed it was AmE, but be it was invented for the nonce.)

    b

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    15,314
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: take a pick

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I remember a broadcast by Alastair (I?) Cooke about 3 or four years ago in which he used the expression "hyphenated Americans" to refer to people who claimed allegiance to America but modified the expression with their (real or mythologized) provenance: 'Italian-Americans', 'Afro-Americans' and so on. I wonder if this usage could be relevant?

    (I assumed it was AmE, but be it was invented for the nonce.)

    b
    Yes, I've heard "hyphenated Americans" a number of times. It also applies to Afro-Americans as well as Irish-Americans, etc. I think this is different from "hyphenated countries".

Similar Threads

  1. pick up
    By bread in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 31-May-2006, 21:38
  2. pick
    By jountoss in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Apr-2006, 04:22
  3. the usage of 'pick up'
    By peppy_man in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Feb-2006, 04:40
  4. choose, select, and pick
    By billy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-May-2005, 05:26

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •