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    #1

    Sequential word order for a title

    I'm interested in knowing if the following document's title is correct:

    Main subject of the fifth international seminar on beef and milk competitiveness.


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    #2

    Re: Sequential word order for a title

    Is this the fifth international seminar on beef and milk competitiveness?

    Or is only the main subject of this international seminar going to be beef and milk conmpetitiveness? (with other subsidiary, or even non-related, topics do be
    discussed).

    Does it involve milk only or the more inclusive "dairy products"? (cheese, yogurt, etc)


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    #3

    Re: Sequential word order for a title

    Yes, that is the fifth international seminar on beef and milk competitiveness.


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    #4

    Re: Sequential word order for a title

    Then it's fine to write,

    The Fifth International Seminar on Beef and Dairy Competitiveness.

    Most commonly, in my own experience, you would capitalize each of the words with the exception of articles, prepositions, and conjuctions, as in the third example below.

    You might also leave out the beginning article "The". That is a personal choice of style, it's common in newsprint, and a title can sometimes appear more authoritative when written in this fashion.

    (the following was reprinted from a Wikipedia entry on capitalization.)
    Headings and publication titles

    THE VITAMINS ARE IN MY FRESH BRUSSELS SPROUTS
    all-uppercase letters
    The Vitamins Are In My Fresh Brussels Sprouts
    capitalization of all words, regardless of the part of speech
    The Vitamins Are in My Fresh Brussels Sprouts
    capitalization of all words, except for internal articles, prepositions and conjunctions
    The Vitamins are in My Fresh Brussels Sprouts
    capitalization of all words, except for internal articles, prepositions, conjunctions and forms of to be
    The Vitamins are in my Fresh Brussels Sprouts
    capitalization of all words, except for internal closed-class words
    The Vitamins are in my fresh Brussels Sprouts
    capitalization of all nouns
    The vitamins are in my fresh Brussels sprouts
    sentence-style capitalization (sentence case), only the first word and proper nouns are capitalized
    the vitamins are in my fresh Brussels sprouts
    capitalization of proper nouns only
    the vitamins are in my fresh brussels sprouts
    all-lowercase letters

    Among U.S. publishers, it is still a common typographic practice to capitalize additional words in titles. This is an old form of emphasis, similar to the more modern practice of using a larger or boldface font for titles. Most capitalize all words except for internal closed-class words, or internal articles, prepositions and conjunctions. Some capitalize longer prepositions such as "between", but not shorter ones. Some capitalize only nouns, others capitalize all words.

    The convention followed by many British publishers (particularly scientific publishers, like Nature and New Scientist, and newspapers, like the The Guardian and The Times) is the same used in other languages (e.g. French), namely to use sentence-style capitalization in titles and headlines, where capitalization follows the same rules that apply for sentences. This is also widely used in the U.S., especially in bibliographic references and library catalogues. This convention is also used in the International Organization for Standardization and Wikipedia house styles. The Oxford Manual of Style suggests capitalising "the first word and all nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs, but generally not articles, conjunctions and short prepositions."[2]

    Book titles are often emphasized on cover and title pages through the use of all-uppercase letters. Both British and U.S. publishers use this convention.

    In creative typography, such as music record covers and other artistic material, all styles are commonly encountered, including all-lowercase letters.


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    #5

    Re: Sequential word order for a title

    I appreciate your thorough explanation. Once again, Thank You!

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