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  1. #1
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    Default "Storms are good to happen"

    Storms are good to happen.

    Does that make sense? I know you can write "it is good for storms to happen", but I want to know if the first makes sense or not - and if not, why?

  2. #2
    matilda Guest

    Talking Re: "Storms are good to happen"

    yes. the first sentence seems ok. what problem do you think it has?

  3. #3
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: "Storms are good to happen"

    Quote Originally Posted by Passionwagon View Post
    Storms are good to happen.

    Does that make sense? I know you can write "it is good for storms to happen", but I want to know if the first makes sense or not - and if not, why?

    Your sentence would probably be understood, but it is not idiomatic English. If you parse the sentence, you have:

    storms: noun, subject
    are: linking verb
    good: predicate adjective
    to happen: infinitive (but it just hangs there)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: "Storms are good to happen"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Your sentence would probably be understood, but it is not idiomatic English.
    .
    .
    .
    Matilda seemed so sure that I thought it was an AmE meaning: *'Storms are likely to happen' (as in 'it is a good bet [or a reasonable guess] that storms will happen'). It's certainly meaningless in BE, though a sympathetic native speaker might interpret it in the meaning cited above ("it is good for storms to happen sometimes"),

    b

    ps - My first example was a [I]supposed[/B] meaning. I think it's wrong.
    Last edited by BobK; 29-Sep-2006 at 10:54. Reason: Added ps

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    Default Re: "Storms are good to happen"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Matilda seemed so sure that I thought it was an AmE meaning: *'Storms are likely to happen' (as in 'it is a good bet [or a reasonable guess] that storms will happen'). It's certainly meaningless in BE, though a sympathetic native speaker might interpret it in the meaning cited above ("it is good for storms to happen sometimes"),

    b
    That's the meaning I would have gotten from it.

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