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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default three questions...

    The three sentences below are used as having the same meaning with the one underlined. And I have some questions each of them.


    1.
    I wonder about the meaning and usage of "older", the comparative form of "old". Should it be the comparative form so that the sentence means the same with the sentence below? Or is it alright if i use "old" instead of "older"? Any difference?

    This store is having a sale on older footwear.
    This store has a clearance sale on footwear.


    2.
    When I say, "they may be sold out.", at this time, does "they" mean the store or the goods? Or can it be both? In the sentence "It may be out of stock.", I think "it" means a goods.


    They may be sold out.
    It may be out of stock.


    3.
    I found a word "rash" in the dictionary and wondered if I could use it instead of "bumps" to be the same with "blotches." I'd like to hear your opinion about it. It's about an allergic reaction on someone's face after using a skincare product.


    There are small bumps on my face.
    I have small blotches all over my face.


    Thanks a lot & have a great day!

  2. #2
    claude Guest

    Default Re: three questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by pb
    There are small bumps on my face.
    I have small blotches all over my face.
    I think a bump has 3 dimensions but a blotche has 2.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    In 2, they means the goods.

    In 1, a clearance sale is more complete than an ordinary sale.

    I agree with Claude about 3- a bump is a raised area, like a bruise, while a blotch is a red area of skin.

  4. #4
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default

    If you say the store is having a sale on old footwear it seems that you are saying they are selling old shoes. I'm not sure what older footware would refer to, since shoes generally are not sold on the basis of who is going to be wearing them.

    If somebody says "They may be sold out" it almost certainly refers to the item for sale. Perhaps they will give you a raincheck.

    :wink:

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    'Older' means older styles to me.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    'Older' means older styles to me.
    Old-fashioned?

    :)

  7. #7
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    Yes.

  8. #8
    jzink Guest

    Default Re: three questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by pb
    3.
    I found a word "rash" in the dictionary and wondered if I could use it instead of "bumps" to be the same with "blotches." I'd like to hear your opinion about it. It's about an allergic reaction on someone's face after using a skincare product.


    There are small bumps on my face.
    I have small blotches all over my face.
    You could use the word "rash" in place of the word "bumps", but you would not say, "There are small rashes on my face."
    "Rash" generally refers to the entire affected area, whereas bumps refers to each individual spot. A rash would include many bumps... or many blotches. So you would say, "There is a rash on my face."
    In general, the word rash is used most often to describe an allergic reaction of the skin. :wink:

    Jessica

  9. #9
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    Default Re: three questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by jzink
    You could use the word "rash" in place of the word "bumps", but you would not say, "There are small rashes on my face."
    "Rash" generally refers to the entire affected area, whereas bumps refers to each individual spot. A rash would include many bumps... or many blotches. So you would say, "There is a rash on my face."
    In general, the word rash is used most often to describe an allergic reaction of the skin. :wink:

    Jessica
    I'd also use blotch for a permanent mark, as well as a temporary one, whereas a rash is always temporary. If it were itchy, I'd use rash.

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