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  1. #11
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re:
    • For this purpose, the State Council has already issued instructions, and all local governments and departments should implement them conscientiously.

    We have already issued instructions concerning the matter under discussion, and this time we want local governments and departments to really follow the instructions instead of just pretending to.

    :wink:

    Re:
    • We must accelerate the utilization of information technology in government administration, and promote e-administration to improve our working efficiency and exercise more effective supervision.

    We hope that by using computer technology more we can watch people better and catch them when they do something wrong.

    :)

  2. #12
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    Default differences

    RonRee,I don't know how you feel about a working report "with Chinese characteristics". However,for me,it's very interesting to compare your correction with the original version. Jiang,Don't take this wrong,I mean,it's not a matter of right or wrong,idiomatic or unidiomatic,it's even not a matter of language,it's the differences in the way we think and talk. The western way is comfortable and easy to read,and the Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. And I personally like the western way.

  3. #13
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    The Western way can also be formal- a lotof modern business language is murderously dull,IMHO..

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    The Western way can also be formal- a lotof modern business language is murderously dull,IMHO..
    Thanks to your information,tdol. I didn't know there are "murderously dull business language" in the west.
    Exactly speaking,"the Chinese way" has something to do with the political reality in China. Whenever I listen to this type of report,I feel like being "mentally violated". Sorry,a bit off-topic...

  5. #15
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    Default Re: differences

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    RonRee,I don't know how you feel about a working report "with Chinese characteristics". However,for me,it's very interesting to compare your correction with the original version. Jiang,Don't take this wrong,I mean,it's not a matter of right or wrong,idiomatic or unidiomatic,it's even not a matter of language,it's the differences in the way we think and talk. The western way is comfortable and easy to read,and the Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. And I personally like the western way.
    What I do is try to figure out what people really mean and put it into idiomatic English. It seems to me that bureaucratese (the way bureaucrats talk) is quite similar in English and in Chinese. I think you will see instances of bureaucratic "spin" in English just as often as in Chinese.

    I did not, of course, intend to give offense to anyone. I was just giving my interpretation of things.

    :)

  6. #16
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re:
    • If possible,please correct any mistakes I make.I'd appreciate it very much.

    Um, you might want to get in the habit of spacing after punctuation: commas and periods, for example.

    :)

  7. #17
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: differences

    For several times I was told Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. Why is that? Is it because of Chinese culture or because English is a foreign language and when traanslating from Chinese into English the tone becomes serious and formal?

    Jiang

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    RonRee,I don't know how you feel about a working report "with Chinese characteristics". However,for me,it's very interesting to compare your correction with the original version. Jiang,Don't take this wrong,I mean,it's not a matter of right or wrong,idiomatic or unidiomatic,it's even not a matter of language,it's the differences in the way we think and talk. The western way is comfortable and easy to read,and the Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. And I personally like the western way.
    What I do is try to figure out what people really mean and put it into idiomatic English. It seems to me that bureaucratese (the way bureaucrats talk) is quite similar in English and in Chinese. I think you will see instances of bureaucratic "spin" in English just as often as in Chinese.

    I did not, of course, intend to give offense to anyone. I was just giving my interpretation of things.

    :)

  8. #18
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: differences

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    For several times I was told Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. Why is that? Is it because of Chinese culture or because English is a foreign language and when traanslating from Chinese into English the tone becomes serious and formal?

    Jiang
    Well, since I don't know Chinese it is hard for me to say. It could be a cultural thing, but it could be something else. Perhaps JWSChang will see this and comment. (He is from Singapore and speaks English and Chinese.)

    (Say: "I have been told several times...." The word "for" is used to express duration ("I waited for an hour") and not number.)

    :)

  9. #19
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: differences

    :)
    Thank you for your correction. I'll wait for JWS Chang's comment.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by jiang
    For several times I was told Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. Why is that? Is it because of Chinese culture or because English is a foreign language and when traanslating from Chinese into English the tone becomes serious and formal?

    Jiang
    Well, since I don't know Chinese it is hard for me to say. It could be a cultural thing, but it could be something else. Perhaps JWSChang will see this and comment. (He is from Singapore and speaks English and Chinese.)

    (Say: "I have been told several times...." The word "for" is used to express duration ("I waited for an hour") and not number.)

    :)

  10. #20
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    Default Re: differences

    [quote="jiang"]For several times I was told Chinese way is kind of serious and formal. Why is that? Is it because of Chinese culture or because English is a foreign language and when traanslating from Chinese into English the tone becomes serious and formal?

    Sorry, I didn't make myself clear. When I said "It's the differences in the way we think and talk", I was not really referring to Chinese culture. I figure there's a political factor here. In Taiwan, I don't think you would ever hear anything like this. Of course, this is my own opinion. No offence to anyone here.

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