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Thread: gerund or noun

  1. #1
    pucubuwi is offline Newbie
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    Smile gerund or noun

    whats a gerund and whats the difference between gerund and noun? thanks~

  2. #2
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
    Mister Micawber is offline Key Member
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    Re: gerund or noun

    .
    A gerund is an -ing verb form used as a noun: Skiing is dangerous.
    .

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    Nguyen Tuyet is offline Junior Member
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    Re: gerund or noun

    Quote Originally Posted by pucubuwi View Post
    whats a gerund and whats the difference between gerund and noun? thanks~
    In the funtional of grammar, gerund act as a noun. That mean, it can be used as subject:
    ex: eating out is very interesting.
    It can be used as an object
    ex: We enjoy playing football very much
    it is used after a preposition
    ex: I am interested in teaching english
    But I think the main diffirence is that the way to form a gerund and a noun.

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    Re: gerund or noun

    Ok, perhaps I'm complicating things now, but...

    The term "gerund" is not used by modern grammars; the term "-ing clause" is preferred. The reason?

    Take the example:

    Being an only child, she felt lonely.

    In this sentence, "being an only child" is a clause (non-finite, for the advanced learners). It's a rather dangerous game to start seeing -ing as something similar to nour .

  5. #5
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    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Re: gerund or noun

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariner View Post
    Ok, perhaps I'm complicating things now, but...

    The term "gerund" is not used by modern grammars; the term "-ing clause" is preferred. The reason?

    Take the example:

    Being an only child, she felt lonely.

    In this sentence, "being an only child" is a clause (non-finite, for the advanced learners). It's a rather dangerous game to start seeing -ing as something similar to nour .
    That is a point of view, but it surely is not universal.

    The word "gerund" is firmly embedded in English language teaching. What I think is dangerous is developing a system in which one does not differentiate gerunds from participles. In your sentence, "being" is a participle, not a gerund. And many (probably most) would call it an adjectival participial phrase. I am familiar with the "non-finite clause" viewpoint, but I don't prefer it.

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