Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    pucubuwi is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default educational problem vs education problem

    hi! i have some questions confused me...

    1, educational problem vs education problem,
    which one is correct?

    2, America's Next Top Model... is it equal to American Next Top Model?

    3, I hear you cry vs I hear you crying, which one is correct?

    4, should it be 'i'm leaving on this friday' or 'i'm leaving this friday'?

    thank you so much~~

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: educational problem vs education problem

    Quote Originally Posted by pucubuwi View Post
    hi! i have some questions confused me...

    1, educational problem vs education problem,
    which one is correct?

    2, America's Next Top Model... is it equal to American Next Top Model?

    3, I hear you cry vs I hear you crying, which one is correct?

    4, should it be 'i'm leaving on this friday' or 'i'm leaving this friday'?

    thank you so much~~
    1 - depends what you mean. "Deciding when and whether to correct is an educational problem"; but "Children nowadays can't concentrate for more than 3 minutes: it's an educa tion problem". In this case I'd say 'a problem of education', but I've heard it used either way.

    2 - the first - she may not be American

    3 - either; the second isn't necessarily continuous, but it is repeated

    4 - the second; or "I'm leaving on Friday"; sometimes, colloquially, "I'm leaving Friday". Certainly not 'on this'. There are contexts that would permit 'on that', but that wouldn't refer to the Friday of the present week:
    "When's half-term?"
    "I don't know, either the week starting on the 4th or the 11th".
    "Well, whichever week it is, I'm leaving on that Friday."
    This would be rare - probably best not to worry about it.

    b

    ps - Afterthought:

    If you were pointing to a calendar, you could say "I'm leaving on this Friday", but that context is so rare that even I would ignore it
    Last edited by BobK; 05-Oct-2006 at 14:23. Reason: Added ps

Similar Threads

  1. Four tenses problem
    By ben9108 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2010, 03:49
  2. Education
    By Flash in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Mar-2005, 14:20
  3. No Problem / No Problems
    By jack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Dec-2004, 11:05
  4. Problem / Uncountable
    By jack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2004, 12:29
  5. composition opinion about education
    By jvaldelv in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-Jan-2004, 17:50

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •