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Thread: parts of speech

  1. #1
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default parts of speech

    Is gerund considered a noun? Can we classify it somehow?
    What about articles? Which word-class do they belong to?

    Are there some other words that don't belong to any word-classes?

    (Could you correct the mistakes I made, please?)

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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Is gerund considered a noun? Can we classify it somehow?
    What about articles? Which word-class do they belong to?

    Are there some other words that don't belong to any word-classes?

    (Could you correct the mistakes I made, please?)
    Yes, a gerund (often called a verbal) is classified as a noun in the "parts of speech" grammar system.

    Articles are classified as "articles" in the 9 parts of speech system. Those who recognize only 8 parts of speech classify articles as adjectives.

    The only word that doesn't fit the classification scheme is the "to" in a "to infinitive. Most people call that a "particle". Because that is not part of the parts of speech system, many dictionaries list it under "preposition", but it is clearly not a prepositiion, IMO.

    Some people also use "particle" for the preposition or adverb part of phrasal verbs. Perhaps "particle" will become the 10th part of speech.
    Last edited by MikeNewYork; 08-Oct-2006 at 17:46.

  3. #3
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Yes, a gerund (often called a verbal) is classified as a noun in the "parts of speech" grammar system.

    Articles are classified as "articles" in the 9 parts of speech system. Thiose who recognize only 8 parts of speech classify articles as adjectives.

    The only word that doesn't fit the classification scheme is the "to" in a "to infinitive. Most people call that a "particle". Because that is not part of the parts of speech system, many dictionaries list it under "preposition", but it is clearly not a prepositiion, IMO.

    Some people also use "particle" for the preposition or adverb part of phrasal verbs. Perhaps "particle" will become the 10th part of speech.
    There are already 9 classes, aren't there?
    nouns, adjectives, pronouns, numerals, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections...

    What about these words? Where do they belong?
    - so, well... (e.g. Well, you should do it.), yes, no...
    are they considered particles as well?

  4. #4
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Ah! I see... there is no "numeralia" class in English... Numbers five, thirteenth etc. are considered nouns, then?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    There are already 9 classes, aren't there?
    nouns, adjectives, pronouns, numerals, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections...

    What about these words? Where do they belong?
    - so, well... (e.g. Well, you should do it.), yes, no...
    are they considered particles as well?
    I've never heard "numerals" as a part of speech, but some individuals like to tinker with the system.

    Usually, those hard to classify words (mostly discourse markers) are classified as adverbs. Some people object to that classification.

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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Ah! I see... there is no "numeralia" class in English... Numbers five, thirteenth etc. are considered nouns, then?
    Depending on their uses, numbers can be nouns, adjectives, or pronouns.

  7. #7
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I've never heard "numerals" as a part of speech, but some individuals like to tinker with the system.

    Usually, those hard to classify words (mostly discourse markers) are classified as adverbs. Some people object to that classification.
    Does it mean that "yes/no" are adverbs?

    What about this sentence? "What did you do?" Is "what" considered an adjective or a pronoun? How can I recognize it?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Depending on their uses, numbers can be nouns, adjectives, or pronouns.
    Could you show it on some examples, please? I can't imagine a number - pronoun...

  8. #8
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Does it mean that "yes/no" are adverbs?

    What about this sentence? "What did you do?" Is "what" considered an adjective or a pronoun? How can I recognize it?



    Could you show it on some examples, please? I can't imagine a number - pronoun...
    Yes, "yes" and "no" are normally classified as adverbs. This is probably justified by the words being used to answer questions. They either affirm or negate the statement.

    In your question, "what" is a pronoun. Rearranged: You did do what. "What" stands in for the action that was done.

    Numbers are used as pronouns quite often.

    I am having five for dinner. Five stands in for five people.
    It is the 13th of October. 13th stands in for 13th day.
    One must follow one's conscious. One stands in for a person.
    Hundreds were killed in the crash.
    Two's company; three's a crowd.

  9. #9
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Did I classify them right?


    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post

    I am having five for dinner. Five stands in for five people. => noun
    It is the 13th of October. 13th stands in for 13th day. => adjective
    One must follow one's conscious. One stands in for a person. => noun
    Hundreds were killed in the crash. => noun
    Two's company; three's a crowd. => what does it mean at all? Is it a noun or an adjective here?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Did I classify them right?
    I was giving you examples of numbers used as pronouns.

    Two's company; three's a crowd = Two people are a couple and the third one should go away.

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