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Thread: parts of speech

  1. #11
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I was giving you examples of numbers used as pronouns.

    Two's company; three's a crowd = Two people are a couple and the third one should go away.
    Ha ha.... that's funny . And a little said too... I don't really understand how the numbers you wrote can be pronouns... it is weird to me... You know - I can't compare it with my mother tongue - in my language, Czch, there are 10 classes and one of them is "numeralia".

    Pronouns... he, she, they, his, what, which, some, nothing... Am I right? Are they all pronouns?
    Then, I don't understand the difference between pronouns and nouns...
    Could you please write some examples using numbers as nouns?

  2. #12
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Ha ha.... that's funny . And a little said too... I don't really understand how the numbers you wrote can be pronouns... it is weird to me... You know - I can't compare it with my mother tongue - in my language, Czch, there are 10 classes and one of them is "numeralia".

    Pronouns... he, she, they, his, what, which, some, nothing... Am I right? Are they all pronouns?
    Then, I don't understand the difference between pronouns and nouns...
    Could you please write some examples using numbers as nouns?

    I think I'm done here. Why don't you try some examples?

  3. #13
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I think I'm done here. Why don't you try some examples?

    OK, I will try it, but it's sure it will be all wrong! You see, I considered the ones, that were pronouns, nouns actually...

    Three people went to see the show. => adjective? pronoun?
    Thirteen is my favourite number. => noun?
    Number thirteen is my favourite one. => adjective?
    It's four o'clock right now. => noun?
    He came to the first person he saw. => adjective?
    The first time he saw her, he thought ... => adjective?
    It costs five dollars. => noun?

  4. #14
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    OK, I will try it, but it's sure it will be all wrong! You see, I considered the ones, that were pronouns, nouns actually...

    Three people went to see the show. => adjective? pronoun?
    Thirteen is my favourite number. => noun?
    Number thirteen is my favourite one. => adjective?
    It's four o'clock right now. => noun?
    He came to the first person he saw. => adjective?
    The first time he saw her, he thought ... => adjective?
    It costs five dollars. => noun?
    It is a bit difficult to explain. A pronoun stands in for a noun. A number as a noun represents a quantity: Five plus five equals ten. All the numbers are nouns. When a number stands in for a quantity of something, people, widgets, etc, it is acting as a pronoun.

    Three people went to see the show. => adjective? pronoun?
    Thirteen is my favourite number. => noun?
    Number thirteen is my favourite one. => adjective? noun
    It's four o'clock right now. => noun?
    He came to the first person he saw. => adjective?
    The first time he saw her, he thought ... => adjective?
    It costs five dollars. => adjective


    I'm having five for dinner. pronoun (You did not invite the number 5 for dinner.)

  5. #15
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I'm having five for dinner. pronoun (You did not invite the number 5 for dinner.)
    Oh, thank you so much, Mike! I believe I can understand it now... Better said... I hope so!

    The last sentence you wrote gave me a really good explanation!

  6. #16
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    I'll try to write some other pronouns.... could you have a look whether all of them really are pronouns, please?

    he, she, they, his, what, which, some, nothing, anybody ?

    I am not quite sure about nothing and anybody... Are they nouns or pronouns?
    What about "anywhere"? I suppose it's an adverb, isn't it?

  7. #17
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Oh, thank you so much, Mike! I believe I can understand it now... Better said... I hope so!

    The last sentence you wrote gave me a really good explanation!
    I was running out of examples. That was an afterthought. I'm glad it helped you.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    I'll try to write some other pronouns.... could you have a look whether all of them really are pronouns, please?

    he, she, they, his, what, which, some, nothing, anybody ?

    I am not quite sure about nothing and anybody... Are they nouns or pronouns?
    What about "anywhere"? I suppose it's an adverb, isn't it?
    All of them, but "anywhere". ("His" is technically a possessive adjective, but it can be used as a pronoun).

    Also: I, him, her, it, we, you, them, one, himself, herself, itself, myself, themselves, nobody, anyone, no one, that, who, whom, whoever, whomever, etc.

  9. #19
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    All of them, but "anywhere". ("His" is technically a possessive adjective, but it can be used as a pronoun).
    In what case can it be used as a pronoun, then?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Also: I, him, her, it, we, you, them, one, himself, herself, itself, myself, themselves, nobody, anyone, no one, that, who, whom, whoever, whomever, etc.
    no one.. I thought it was considered two words, which implies two parts of speech.... Are there some other "two words" that collocate together and are considered just a one word, actually?

  10. #20
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    Default Re: parts of speech

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    In what case can it be used as a pronoun, then?



    no one.. I thought it was considered two words, which implies two parts of speech.... Are there some other "two words" that collocate together and are considered just a one word, actually?
    I didn't take my car, I took his. (His is a pronoun there).

    "No one" is technically two words, but it is one pronoun. The only reason it has stayed separate is because it would like a word with an "oo" sound if it were combined. (like noose and loose)

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