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  1. #1
    kahhong is offline Member
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    Cool Have still or vice versa

    Hello there, which one is correct and why?
    could someone explain it to me, please?

    1.I have still my pen with me.
    2.I still have my pen with me.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Have still or vice versa

    "I still have my pen with me" is correct.

    Still usually goes before the verb:

    Do you still have a headache?
    I still buy my milk from the supermarket.
    She still swims every day.
    I still haven't heard their last album.

    However, there are exceptions:

    I have still got the book you lent me.
    I was still in bed when you called.
    He is still at work.
    We have still got to meet John.

    Can anyone explain the rule regarding the placement of the word still? I'd try, but I'm not sure I'd get it right.

  3. #3
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    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Have still or vice versa

    Quote Originally Posted by boothling View Post
    "I still have my pen with me" is correct.

    Still usually goes before the verb:

    Do you still have a headache?
    I still buy my milk from the supermarket.
    She still swims every day.
    I still haven't heard their last album.

    However, there are exceptions:

    I have still got the book you lent me.
    I was still in bed when you called.
    He is still at work.
    We have still got to meet John.

    Can anyone explain the rule regarding the placement of the word still? I'd try, but I'm not sure I'd get it right.
    Were I to form a rule, I would say:

    1. Still follows the auxiliary verb and precedes the main verb in questions formed with auxiliaries.
    2. Still follows linking verbs in questions.
    3. Still comes between auxiliary and main verbs in statements.
    4. Still can come before or after linking verbs in statements.
    5. Still precedes regular verbs in statements.

    I am open to revisions.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Have still or vice versa

    Thanks. But can you give a couple of examples for rule four?

    Still can come before or after linking verbs in statements.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "linking verbs".

    Also, still seems to behave differently with the verb "to be", always coming after the verb (I am still hungry; you are still on hold).

  5. #5
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Have still or vice versa

    Quote Originally Posted by boothling View Post
    Thanks. But can you give a couple of examples for rule four?

    Still can come before or after linking verbs in statements.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "linking verbs".

    Also, still seems to behave differently with the verb "to be", always coming after the verb (I am still hungry; you are still on hold).
    Linking verbs are be, become, appear, and some uses of sensing verbs.

    With simple sentences using "be", still usually follows the verb.
    I am still here.
    We were still waiting.

    However, many uses of the reverse are seen.

    The Packers still are confident about their chances.

    There are also exceptions with infinitives.

    The vase appeared to still be intact.

    Also with sensing verbs: The dog still smelled bad.

    I tried not to overstate the "rule".

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