Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default the united states etc.

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    If we all set________ work, we can fulfil our plan ahead of schedule.

    a. to b. about
    The answer is 'a' but I think both are correct. Is that right?

    No.2

    She was run_____ by a car and died instantly.
    a. over b. down
    The answer is 'a' and I think that's a better one because 'she died' instantly. But I think 'b' is also correct because it happens when people run down they also died. Is that right?

    No.3

    I think I should put 'the' in front of 'United States'. But when I surfed the Internet I also came cross 'United States'. Does it mean both are correct or 'United States' is not formal?


    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,341
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: the united states etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    ...

    No.1
    If we all set________ work, we can fulfil our plan ahead of schedule.

    a. to b. about
    The answer is 'a' but I think both are correct. Is that right?
    Nearly. "If we all set about working", "If we all set about the task", "If we all get down to work", are OK, but "set about work" sounds wrong to me, except in the context where you amplify the work involved: "we all set about the work of writing the labels".

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.2

    She was run_____ by a car and died instantly.
    a. over b. down
    The answer is 'a' and I think that's a better one because 'she died' instantly. But I think 'b' is also correct because it happens when people run down they also died. Is that right?
    They're more or less interchangeable now. In British English, I feel people use either "run over" (for a serious accident, involving hospital or the morgue) or "knocked down" (for cuts and bruises); but I've heard both,

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    No.3

    I think I should put 'the' in front of 'United States'. But when I surfed the Internet I also came cross 'United States'. Does it mean both are correct or 'United States' is not formal?
    ...
    Where "United States" is a noun , I'd give it the "the" (if it means the USA); but where it's used adjectivally (some people call this 'a noun in apposition'), it needs whichever article is appropriate: "the United States Navy" but "a United States citizen".

    b

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,671
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: the united states etc.

    &
    Dear BobK,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand No.2 and No.3.
    As for No.1 I am sorry I didn't explain the confusion. The reason that I feel confused is that I read a sentence in my dictionary ' He set about his homework right after supper'. I consulted the phrase 'set about' in Random House Webster's Dictionary of American English and was surprised to find the following:

    set about: to begin; start: set+ about + obj: to set about one's work.
    set + about + verb-ing: to set about repariing the engines.

    It seems the best way is to avoid using 'set about + verb-ing'.
    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Nearly. "If we all set about working", "If we all set about the task", "If we all get down to work", are OK, but "set about work" sounds wrong to me, except in the context where you amplify the work involved: "we all set about the work of writing the labels".



    They're more or less interchangeable now. In British English, I feel people use either "run over" (for a serious accident, involving hospital or the morgue) or "knocked down" (for cuts and bruises); but I've heard both,



    Where "United States" is a noun , I'd give it the "the" (if it means the USA); but where it's used adjectivally (some people call this 'a noun in apposition'), it needs whichever article is appropriate: "the United States Navy" but "a United States citizen".

    b
    Last edited by jiang; 12-Oct-2006 at 08:08.

Similar Threads

  1. Which one is the answer? (plz help ㅠㅠ)
    By juliana0403 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Sep-2006, 15:37
  2. Teaching In United Arab Emirates
    By missnmiller in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 30-Aug-2006, 03:27
  3. looking for ESL teaching positions in the United States
    By philmhnyc in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Jan-2005, 02:34
  4. Is it right to write: The Japanese must be united. Thanks ..
    By Helped Wanted in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Nov-2003, 16:40
  5. united family
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Sep-2003, 03:25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk