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Thread: Gerund and noun


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    #1

    Smile Gerund and noun

    I read a sentence from "Winning" by Jack Welch:

    "In the meantime, it would be dumb to get booted for sulking."

    I wonder if it's right to use "for sulking", because sulk has its noun form.
    So should I say that this sentence is wrong and it should be changed into "for sulk"?

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Gerund and noun

    No - "for sulking" is right. You're right to say "sulk" can be a noun on its own:

    "She's having a sulk"
    "That's OK - you go off and have a good sulk. You'll be back, I'll bet, as soon as you get hungry."

    But in your case the text is talking about the fact of sulking (or "having a sulk").

    b


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    #3

    Re: Gerund and noun

    Dear Bobk:

    Thanks for giving me clear explanation.

    I wonder that the sentence I quoted is not correct because my grammar book told me that "He deserved punishing" is a wrong sentence.

    But I understand the reasons because of your explanation.

    Thanks a lot!!!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Gerund and noun

    Quote Originally Posted by wahaha View Post
    I wonder that the sentence I quoted is not correct because my grammar book told me that "He deserved punishing" is a wrong sentence.
    I think the book said that because a lot of people were once taught that. According to this rule, you should in that case say "he deserved to be punished" or "he deserved [+ either article, or none] punishment", or even (for real sticklers) "he deserved that someone should punish him".

    But "he deserved punishing" is quite commonly used (slightly informal, but becoming less so).

    Quote Originally Posted by wahaha View Post
    But I understand the reasons because of your explanation.

    Thanks a lot!!!
    Glad to be of service

    b

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