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  1. retro's Avatar
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    #1

    Nevertheless vs. Nonetheless

    Hi!

    Can "nevertheless and "nonetheless" be used interchangeably?
    Also, does the meaning change when either replaced by "however", "though" or "although"?

    Are the following sentences correct?
    #1 League leader Portsmouth dominated, nevertheless/nonetheless it lost the game to struggling Bolton.

    #2 It seemed too hard to handle for the government to put new laws into effect. It managed (to deal with it) nevertheless/nonetheless.

    #3 There had been protests against unpopular reforms throughout the whole country, but the government didn't resigned nevertheless/nonetheless.


    I'd appreciate native speakers' (preferably AE) help.

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Nevertheless vs. Nonetheless

    There's no difference between them, though 'nonetheless' is less common. As they are normally suprasentencial (contrasting sentences), they can be replaced by 'however', but 'although' normally contrast two clauses within the same sentence so wouldn't work as a replacement. 'Though' is used with a similar effect to however/nevertheless when it placed at the end of the second sentence, but this use is mostly found in informal writing.

    1 Change the punctuation to a semi-colon or period.
    2 Fine
    3 Bit of a mess- you have both but and nevertheless in there.

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