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    #1

    phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    hihi everybody,

    I don't know any phrasal verbs and I'm now wanting to learn it. What I do is to do some exercises but I don't have the answers...is there anyone who can help me?

    phrasal verbs:
    act on, abide by, account for, allude to

    1. Why didn't you act on my warning?

    2. As good citizens, we should abide by the law.

    3. The Financial Secretary couldn't sensibly account for his purchase of a new car without declaring his interest.

    4. The tabloid magazine didn't mention the name of the victim who was sexually harrassed, but it was clear it was alluding to Ms Lau.

    Are all of the sentences above correct? If there's any mistake, can you help me correct it?

  1. Rooster Rou's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Hi Littlebady,

    I am not a teacher, but it all seems to be correct except for harassed is spelled with only one R and not two. I am sure that was just a typo. Did you notice that phrasal verbs often use an infinitive: on, by, for and to?

    Rooster Roo
    Last edited by Rooster Rou; 15-Oct-2006 at 15:19.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by littlebaby View Post
    hihi everybody,

    I don't know any phrasal verbs and I'm now wanting to learn it. What I do is to do some exercises but I don't have the answers...is there anyone who can help me?

    phrasal verbs:
    act on, abide by, account for, allude to

    1. Why didn't you act on my warning?

    2. As good citizens, we should abide by the law.

    3. The Financial Secretary couldn't sensibly account for his purchase of a new car without declaring his interest.

    4. The tabloid magazine didn't mention the name of the victim who was sexually harrassed, but it was clear it was alluding to Ms Lau.

    Are all of the sentences above correct? If there's any mistake, can you help me correct it?
    All of your verbs are used correctly. I don't understand the "without declaring his interest" part of #3, however.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    All of your verbs are used correctly. I don't understand the "without declaring his interest" part of #3, however.
    Imagine that the Financial Secretary has a secret Executive Directorship of a firm that makes cars; he doesn't get paid much for this position (he only has to attend a board meeting once a week), but he does get a huge discount on their products. He bought a car that was way beyond his means, because he could afford it after this discount.

    The authorities ask him how it comes about that he can afford such a car. He can't account for it without declaring his interest.

    Re: another string: this is an example of "sleaze"

    b

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Imagine that the Financial Secretary has a secret Executive Directorship of a firm that makes cars; he doesn't get paid much for this position (he only has to attend a board meeting once a week), but he does get a huge discount on their products. He bought a car that was way beyond his means, because he could afford it after this discount.

    The authorities ask him how it comes about that he can afford such a car. He can't account for it without declaring his interest.

    Re: another string: this is an example of "sleaze"

    b
    I would normally call that a "conflict of interest", but I get your point.


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    #6

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Hi, Littlebaby,
    IMHO these are not phrasal verbs, they are just ordinary verbs that require definite prepositions. Phrasal verbs are those that change their meanings with different prepositions, eg
    Look back
    Look down
    Look for
    Look after etc
    Cheers

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hi, Littlebaby,
    IMHO these are not phrasal verbs, they are just ordinary verbs that require definite prepositions. Phrasal verbs are those that change their meanings with different prepositions, eg
    Look back
    Look down
    Look for
    Look after etc
    Cheers
    Interestimg point. I was doing phrasal verbs with my class once, and came across a usage of 'look down' which both was and wasn't phrasal.

    The passage was about drivers of SUVs (big, noisy, powerful cars) 'looking down on other road users'. At a first reading, I thought this wasn't phrasal; such drivers are in an elevated position, from which they direct their gaze (look) in a downward direction (down). But the writer's view was also that such drivers look down on (view as somehow inferior) other road users. The writer of the piece was, I think intentionally, using this ambiguity.

    Some phrasal verbs can be used in similar ways as this:

    He looked after his mother after she developed Alzheimer's.
    (phrasal)

    He looked after his assailant running away.
    (not phrasal)

    (I'd guess you could do this with most phrasal verbs, if you were creative enough with contexts )

    b

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: phrasal verbs---a-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by Rooster Rou View Post
    Hi Littlebady,

    I am not a teacher, but it all seems to be correct except for harassed is spelled with only one R and not two. I am sure that was just a typo. Did you notice that phrasal verbs often use an infinitive: on, by, for and to?

    Rooster Roo
    Hmmm. I just saw this post. The words you have listed aren't infinitives; they are prepositions/adverbs.

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