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  1. #21
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    Re: Is there a word shurub in Engish ?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I'm not sure that the choice of certain pronunciation patterns was accidental. In my view, "general American" (Midwest in origin) was chosen because it was a very neutral accent and easier to understand than Brooklynese, Southern drawls, Bostoner, and Texan, for example.
    It only became neutral when it became the standard; how else would you judge "neutrality"?

    It most likely came about because that accent was easier to understand in the early days of radio, where reception could be very poor. That's why RP acquired such exaggerated rounded vowels: it's easier to understand over the whistles and hissing. It is also horrible to listen to without the whistles and hissing, and is seen not so much as neutral, more the (usually affected) accent of the most pretentious elements of the upper classes.

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    I think blueabell2go means 'broad scots', which is virtually incomprehensible to anyone else
    rewboss (not blueabell2go) means the dialect actually known as Scots English, as opposed to standard English being spoken with a Scottish accent. Scots English has, among other things, lots of Gaelic thrown in, and is so distinctive that there is even a Scots English Bible available.

  2. #22
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    Re: Is there a word shurub in Engish ?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    rewboss (not blueabell2go) means the dialect actually known as Scots English, as opposed to standard English being spoken with a Scottish accent. Scots English has, among other things, lots of Gaelic thrown in, and is so distinctive that there is even a Scots English Bible available.

    The Bible you refer to is the New Testament in Scots. It was translated from Greek into Scots by Professor William Lorimer of St Andrews University. He translated the various forms of Greek used in the original into various Scots dialects. Not bad for a mere "English dialect". Perhaps we can look forward to a translation of the New Testament directly from Greek into Scouse, Geordie or Cockney Rhyming Slang.

  3. #23
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    Re: Is there a word shurub in Engish ?

    Now I think it is clear to me why some people think it is Shurrub

  4. #24
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    Re: Is there a word shurub in Engish ?

    Quote Originally Posted by blueabell2go View Post
    Perhaps we can look forward to a translation of the New Testament directly from Greek into Scouse, Geordie or Cockney Rhyming Slang.
    You may laugh, but in Germany the Asterix books have been published in a wide range of regional dialects.

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