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Thread: weather

  1. #1
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default weather

    Is there a difference between a "blizzard" and a "snowstorm"?

    Can word "tempest" be used in compounds such as "snow tempest", "thunder tempest" etc.? Is the word used much or is it rather used only in books?

    What is the difference between a gale and a hurricane? Which one is stronger? Hurricane?
    Last edited by Lenka; 22-Oct-2006 at 18:50.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: weather

    "blizzard" is generally considered to be worse than a snowstorm.

    "Tempest" is <literary>, perhaps even <archaic>. I can't say that I recall a text where it was modified with a noun, such as "snow" or "thunder".

    A "gale" is a very strong wind, while "hurricane" is an "extremely violent wind or storm", so there you go

  3. #3
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: weather

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariner View Post
    "blizzard" is generally considered to be worse than a snowstorm.

    "Tempest" is <literary>, perhaps even <archaic>. I can't say that I recall a text where it was modified with a noun, such as "snow" or "thunder".

    A "gale" is a very strong wind, while "hurricane" is an "extremely violent wind or storm", so there you go
    Thanks a lot, Mariner!

    By the way, what does the "so there you go" mean?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: weather

    It means, "there is the explanation"

  5. #5
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: weather

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariner View Post
    It means, "there is the explanation"
    Thanks. I thought it would be something like this. Unfortunately, I sometimes have problems with translations of such sentences .

  6. #6
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    Default Re: weather

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Is there a difference between a "blizzard" and a "snowstorm"?

    What is the difference between a gale and a hurricane? Which one is stronger? Hurricane?

    Blizzard conditions are not determined by the amount of snow that falls, but by the duration of very strong winds and near white-out conditions the storm produces. Blizzards can actually occur with clear skies if strong winds combined with blowing snow fulfill the storm's minimum requirements of at least three hours of sustained winds or frequent gusts of 35 m.p.h. or higher and visibilities reduced to one-quarter mile or less by falling and/or blowing snow.

    In the U.S. the National Weather Service defines the term gale as winds with speeds in a specific range from 34 to 54 m.p.h. and issues gale warnings when winds of that strength are expected to occur. (Tom Skilling, Meteorologist WGN9)

    A hurricane is a tropical storm with winds in excess of 74 m.p.h.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: weather

    Hi river,
    According to the Cobuild and Macmillan dictionaries, blizzard does entail snowfall (and strong winds), but your definition sounds more scientific, therefore possibly more accurate.

  8. #8
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: weather

    Quote Originally Posted by river View Post
    Blizzard conditions are not determined by the amount of snow that falls, but by the duration of very strong winds and near white-out conditions the storm produces. Blizzards can actually occur with clear skies if strong winds combined with blowing snow fulfill the storm's minimum requirements of at least three hours of sustained winds or frequent gusts of 35 m.p.h. or higher and visibilities reduced to one-quarter mile or less by falling and/or blowing snow.

    In the U.S. the National Weather Service defines the term gale as winds with speeds in a specific range from 34 to 54 m.p.h. and issues gale warnings when winds of that strength are expected to occur. (Tom Skilling, Meteorologist WGN9)

    A hurricane is a tropical storm with winds in excess of 74 m.p.h.
    It's quite a difficult explanation! I would have problems to understand such things even if it was written in my native language. You know, I am not just a specialist in such problems.

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