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Thread: Parts of speech

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Parts of speech

    In my english class a student gave the teacher the following question.

    We cancelled tomorrow dinner with Joan.

    Is tomorrow an adjective or adverb? explain why

    Should tomorrow dinner be written as tomorrow's dinner?

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    I need this information for tomorrow.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    You could say 'We cancelled dinner tomorrow with Joan' or 'tomorrow's dinner'. In the latter, it's a noun, as seen by the fact that it has a possessive form. In the former, it is an adverb of time.

  3. #3
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    I think we should use " We cancelled tomorrow dinner with Joan" because tomorrow can be a noun and plays a role of an adjective modifying the word "dinner"
    If tomorrow is an adverb of time, maybe the sentence will be changed to " We will cancell the dinner with Joan tomorrow"
    How about your idea?
    :)

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    The position of 'with Joan' is felxible, so moving 'tomorrow' is fine. However, I don't see that 'tomorrow' coule realistically be used as an adjectival noun here, because it is a one-off rather than something recognisable like 'dinner party'.

  5. #5
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    To Tdol
    Thanks for your answer. But I don 't understand why tomorrow couldn't be used as an adjectival noun and what is a one-off. Will you please make it clearly?
    I often hear that phrase " a tomorrow morning", is the word tomorrow a kind of adjective? If not, what kind of it?

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    'Tomorrow morning' works be cause it is a phrase that has regular meaning. The 'dinner' example does not. To use a noun this way, it has to have a wider meaning that is readily understood. By 'one-off', I meant that it referred to a single occasion. Also, if we say 'I'll see you tomorrow morning', then it is an adverbial.

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