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  1. #1
    Mad-ox's Avatar
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    Default bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    hi,

    What does a bourgeois person mean?

    m

    PS AND How do you pronounce it? I know that this is a French word but is seldom used in English literature.
    Last edited by Mad-ox; 29-Oct-2006 at 14:23.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    I believe in France, bourgeois usually referred to an aristocrat. In Marxist theory, bourgeois is used to refer to the "ruling" class. In English, bourgeois refers to the middle class, or rather the stereotypical middle class, with their SUVs, three-car garages, big-screen TVs, etc.

    It is pronounced boor-zhwa.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    Or plurally/ collectivelly= boor-zwah -zhee

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    Technically it meant someone who lived in a burgh or town, and is linked to English and Dutch "burgher". It carried legal implications in France.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    Or plurally/ collectivelly= boor-zwah -zhee
    Isn't that 'h' in the wrong place?

    Incidentally, as a typographical point of useless/arcane information, typesetters who used the old Bourgeois type-face, having left school at the age of 12 (if not earlier), called it /bə`goıs/.

    b

  6. #6
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    Default Re: bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    I believe in France, bourgeois usually referred to an aristocrat. In Marxist theory, bourgeois is used to refer to the "ruling" class. In English, bourgeois refers to the middle class, or rather the stereotypical middle class, with their SUVs, three-car garages, big-screen TVs, etc.

    It is pronounced boor-zhwa.
    Excuse me but "bourgeois" don't mean aristocrat! "bourgeois" was the person who, afther French Revolution 1765 got rich by trade business. In our days we use "bourgeois" to refer a wealthy person, but sometimes with low schoolling.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois,bourgeois, bourgeois,

    from Beware the Wealthy Bourgeoisie

    "Before the Revolution, several different types of bourgeois could be identified in Paris: the low, the high, and the moral [bonne.] Sometimes these last two are confused, and it might seem that they were one and the same. But that would be a big mistake.

    The high bourgeois is an aristocrat in the full sense of the word, but he does not have the energy or loyalty of the nobles. He is, however, proud to walk immediately behind them. This was the class from which municipal magistrates and other city officials were normally chosen."



    Also, in AmE, bourgeois doesn't necessarily mean "wealthy." It is used to describe someone who lives a solid middle-class (perceived to be boring) lifestyle. Someone would describe your father's Oldsmobile as "bourgeois," but not his Porsche.

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