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Thread: Drama

  1. alihandra's Avatar

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    #1

    Thumbs down Drama

    Noting in the drama `s lecture i hear
    my mind is bleeding because of othello & king lear
    i don`t understand even near
    what a complex words i fear
    OH, shakespear`s blank verse makes me tear
    Drama will never be my career
    sorry shakespear forgive me dear
    i am not saying u are bad but i am suffering here
    is there any one helps me in shakespear
    or this message will be ignored like the poetry iam writing here


    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #2

    Re: Drama

    ha-ha! Nice attempt, buddy!
    But if you are really up the creek with shakespears' plays, I would recommend you the site PinkMonkey.com-440+ Free Book Notes,Study Guides,Chapter Summary,Online,Download Booknotes where you can find an optimal solution to your problem.
    I hope this helps cope with Shakespears' plays.

  2. rewboss's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #3

    Re: Drama

    There's no magical formula that will suddenly make you understand and appreciate Shakespeare, but he's not all that bad, poor fellow.

    Part of the problem is that Shakespeare was writing a very long time ago, and things were very different then. Not only was the language very different, but people's ideas of good drama were different as well. Another problem is that Shakespeare is sometimes presented with such reverence, it scares people: bad actors use very impressive gestures and sonorous voices, making the whole thing seem like a religious ritual, rather than a piece of actual drama.

    But if you see Shakespeare performed by people who can breathe life into the words, and speak and act like real people, the whole thing comes alive. Shakespeare wrote comedy (although that wasn't his strong point), fantasy, romance, and history. He tackled themes such as racism and insanity.

    Here's one of my favourite Shakespeare moments. It's from Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 2. Caesar has been assassinated, and Mark Antony is making a speech. But the murderers, led by Brutus, have made him promise not to say anything bad about them.

    If you hear this speech mumbled, or even delivered in an operatic voice, you will miss the irony. I want you to imagine Antony being really, really sarcastic -- especially the words I've put in italics. Don't worry about the meaning of every single word, just remember he's being sarcastic. Also, don't think of it as "blank verse": it may be constructed that way, but it's a speech, and you should observe the punctuation, not the length of the lines.

    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them,
    The good is often interred with their bones;
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious;
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,--
    For Brutus is an honourable man;
    So are they all, all honourable men,--
    Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
    But Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
    Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
    Did this Caesar seem ambitious?
    When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept;
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    You all did see that on the Lupercal
    I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
    Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And, sure, he is an honourable man...

    Ouch. Antony kept his promise, but that speech got the citizens thinking: "He's right, you know: Caesar wasn't such a despot after all, and he shouldn't have been killed." Imagine Antony piling on the irony more and more as the speech goes on, until his constant refrain of "Brutus is an honourable man" begins to sound like a bad thing.

    Of course, this is nowhere near as good as hearing it in real life, but I'm afraid you'll just have to try to imagine it.

  3. alihandra's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 127
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    #4

    Re: Drama

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    There's no magical formula that will suddenly make you understand and appreciate Shakespeare, but he's not all that bad, poor fellow.

    Part of the problem is that Shakespeare was writing a very long time ago, and things were very different then. Not only was the language very different, but people's ideas of good drama were different as well. Another problem is that Shakespeare is sometimes presented with such reverence, it scares people: bad actors use very impressive gestures and sonorous voices, making the whole thing seem like a religious ritual, rather than a piece of actual drama.

    But if you see Shakespeare performed by people who can breathe life into the words, and speak and act like real people, the whole thing comes alive. Shakespeare wrote comedy (although that wasn't his strong point), fantasy, romance, and history. He tackled themes such as racism and insanity.

    Here's one of my favourite Shakespeare moments. It's from Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 2. Caesar has been assassinated, and Mark Antony is making a speech. But the murderers, led by Brutus, have made him promise not to say anything bad about them.

    If you hear this speech mumbled, or even delivered in an operatic voice, you will miss the irony. I want you to imagine Antony being really, really sarcastic -- especially the words I've put in italics. Don't worry about the meaning of every single word, just remember he's being sarcastic. Also, don't think of it as "blank verse": it may be constructed that way, but it's a speech, and you should observe the punctuation, not the length of the lines.

    Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them,
    The good is often interred with their bones;
    So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
    Hath told you Caesar was ambitious;
    If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
    And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
    Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,--
    For Brutus is an honourable man;
    So are they all, all honourable men,--
    Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
    He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
    But Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
    Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
    Did this Caesar seem ambitious?
    When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept;
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And Brutus is an honourable man.
    You all did see that on the Lupercal
    I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
    Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
    Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
    And, sure, he is an honourable man...

    Ouch. Antony kept his promise, but that speech got the citizens thinking: "He's right, you know: Caesar wasn't such a despot after all, and he shouldn't have been killed." Imagine Antony piling on the irony more and more as the speech goes on, until his constant refrain of "Brutus is an honourable man" begins to sound like a bad thing.

    Of course, this is nowhere near as good as hearing it in real life, but I'm afraid you'll just have to try to imagine it.
    You are very educated person

    thank you

    alijandra

  4. alihandra's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #5

    Talking Re: Drama

    Quote Originally Posted by asad hussain View Post
    ha-ha! Nice attempt, buddy!
    But if you are really up the creek with shakespears' plays, I would recommend you the site PinkMonkey.com-440+ Free Book Notes,Study Guides,Chapter Summary,Online,Download Booknotes where you can find an optimal solution to your problem.
    I hope this helps cope with Shakespears' plays.
    thank u

    alijandra

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