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  1. #1
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    I'd like help editing my essay, please read and respond! :D

    The topic is about Microsoft, specifically about a story about Microsoft written by Douglass Coupland.
    His story is called "Microserfs", which can be found at Wired 2.01: Microserfs

    When the general public hears the word “Microsoft”, they may
    immediately think of incredible technological processes or of the vast
    amount of money that company is worth. But in truth, the conditions at
    which the company runs is almost the complete opposite of what the
    general public think.
    It’s true enough that if you think Microsoft, you also generally think
    “geeks” or “nerds”. It’s because Microsoft is a player in the big
    leagues, and they do not just hire people through random selection.
    Every candidate is examined and tested for their skills as a computer
    “code-writer”. But, what most people do not know is that this is all
    what Microsoft employees do, write computer code. They know not much of
    what’s going on to the outside world. I say outside world because
    Microsoft has created a neighborhood for its employees to live in, and
    what goes on outside of this neighborhood goes by unnoticed. Microsoft
    employees seem to live in a bubble, they are not the rich living in huge
    mansions and partying on yachts all day. Anything the employees think
    about somehow relates to work or something that happened at work.
    They’re literally working drones, programmed programmers. Microserfs
    have even fallen into a mind-set that revolves around greed, for
    example, “ ‘It's never been, 'We're doing this for the good of society.'
    It's always been us taking an intellectual pride in putting out a good
    product - and making money. If putting a computer on every desktop and
    in every home didn't make money, we wouldn't do it.’ That sums up most
    of the Microsoft people I know.” They live to work only for the benefit
    of themselves, nothing else matters.
    If one of the deepest cultures as a citizen of the U.S. is simply
    becoming rich, then yes a Microsoft programmer fits the bill exactly.
    Though Microsoft’s employees all make ample amounts of money, they
    basically sell their souls for it. Most of the employees live in “Group
    Houses” near their respective offices, and most of them are absent of
    lives. The narrator, Dan, even describes his life as empty and boring,
    “Living in a group house is a little bit like admitting you're deficient
    in the having-a-life department, but at work you spend your entire life
    crunching code and testing for bugs, and what else are you supposed to
    do? Work, sleep, work, sleep, work, sleep.” Living off instant noodles
    and microwave foods is just a way of life for these millionaires. What
    is confusing is how these Microserfs are making so much money yet live
    in worse conditions than college students.
    Since these workers live their life around their jobs, they also seem
    to worship their upper classed employees. “Bill's so smart. Bill is
    wise. Bill is kind. Bill is benevolent. Bill, Be My Friend...Please ”
    is the general dream, and it seems to boarder on obsession. These are
    the worlds brightest minds working for one other “brighter” mind. With
    such educated minds, why not just go and become independently employed?
    Probably because they’ve all obeyed all the rules all their lives and
    have never experienced anything “outside-the-box”. Without Bill’s mere
    presence, the employees don’t know what their supposed to be doing.
    Without a “Bill Gates” at Microsoft, the company really is empty, “But
    then maybe Bill simply provides a focus for the company when no other
    focus can be found. I mean, if it weren't for the cult of Bill, this
    place would be deadsville - like a great big office supply company.
    Which is sort of what it is. I mean, if you really think about it.”
    Which is true, when it comes down to facts Microsoft is just a tool that
    gets work done. What is especially comical is how Michael is also
    looked up to after just being in the presence of Bill Gates. Everyone
    wants to know what the “big guy” is like, what he talks about, etc.
    It’s like God running a company full of devout Christians. Here’s some
    proof, “Sometimes, in the employee kitchen, when I'm surrounded by the
    dairy cases full of Bill-supplied free beverages, I have to wonder if
    maybe Microsoft's corporate zest for recycling aluminum, plastic, and
    paper is perhaps a sublimation of the staff's hidden desire for
    immortality. Or maybe this whole Bill thing is actually the subconscious
    manufacture of God.”
    As a “Microserf”, it is his or her duty to carry out any demands made
    by any higher ranking official. None of the Microserf’s make their own
    decisions, they all obey orders, follow instructions, they live in a
    world that’s been planned out for them day to day, doing the same things
    over and over again. What’s funny is that the employees have stressed
    and studied for their degrees, and for what? They come out of their
    colleges incredibly bright, yet they are still in a system where they
    have to obey the rules set by people who outrank them. The Microserfs
    have basically worked their way up from one monotonous life and found
    another, better paying monotonous life at Microsoft. Sure, many of the
    employees enjoy being told what to do, because they don’t know how to
    lead a life of their own. But if they keep taking orders, what will
    happen when the day comes that Microsoft doesn’t need as many employees
    as it has? Microserfs are not only unable to have fun, they are unable
    to lead lives outside of Microsoft.
    The book Microserfs reveals to us that Microsoft employees aren’t all
    glory and glamor at all. People think that by sacrificing all those
    years studying to be a computer engineer will pay off, and maybe it does
    pay off if all they want is money. But leading a life that consists of
    nothing but work, being incapable of leading a normal life or
    experiencing certain activities that an average person would, doesn’t
    really sound like the “sweet deal” that is misleadingly offered in a
    position at Microsoft.

  2. #2
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: I'd like help editing my essay, please read and respond! :D

    Quote Originally Posted by Mtsai87 View Post
    The topic is about Microsoft, specifically about a story about Microsoft written by Douglass Coupland.
    His story is called "Microserfs", which can be found at Wired 2.01: Microserfs

    When the general public hears the word “Microsoft”, they may
    immediately think of incredible technological processes or of the vast
    amount of money that company is worth. But in truth, the conditions at
    which the company runs is almost the complete opposite of what the
    general public think.
    But in truth, the conditions at which the company runs is almost the complete opposite of what the general public thinks.
    What does the general public think?

    ~R

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