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Thread: stick out

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    stick out

    For example, I'm on a bus and I saw my friend's elbow placed on the window. I want to tell him to put his elbow in because it might get hit by a vehicle. Should I say don't stick out your elbow because this might get hit by a vehicle? Please advise. I really don't have an idea on how to say this.

    Thanks.

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    Re: stick out

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    For example, I'm on a bus and I saw my friend's elbow placed on the window. I want to tell him to put his elbow in because it might get hit by a vehicle. Should I say don't stick out your elbow because this might get hit by a vehicle? Please advise. I really don't have an idea on how to say this.

    Thanks.
    It would be very slightly better to say 'Don't stick your elbow out', but your version would be OK (except for the this). So my version would be:

    don't stick your elbow out because it might get hit [no need to say 'by a vehicle']

    b

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    Re: stick out

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It would be very slightly better to say 'Don't stick your elbow out', but your version would be OK (except for the this). So my version would be:

    don't stick your elbow out because it might get hit [no need to say 'by a vehicle']

    b


    Does this mean that "stick out" can be used to any part of your body not only limited to tounge. Because, I always hear "stick out your tounge" but never heard of any other than that. Is this a phrasal verb? If it is, how come it is not included in this Web site?

    Thank you so much.

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    Re: stick out

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    Does this mean that "stick out" can be used to any part of your body not only limited to tounge. Because, I always hear "stick out your tounge" but never heard of any other than that. Is this a phrasal verb? If it is, how come it is not included in this Web site?

    Thank you so much.
    There are conflicting definitions of phrasal verb. A traditional one is that it's a combination of a verb and a preposition. In this sense, 'stick out' would be classed here as a phrasal verb. I don't believe it should be. There are contexts where 'stick out' is a phrasal verb (or part of one: stick out for): The union advised its members to stick out for more money. And, without 'for': The strike lasted for two years, but the miners stuck it out.. I think these phrasal verbs may not be in the UE list for one of two reasons: either simple oversight, or an editorial decision that these meanings won't be used or met by a majority of learners.

    But in the non-phrasal use, any body part (within the bounds of physiology) can stick out (whether they do or not is another matter - sometimes there are stronger collocations with other verbs: for example, eyes bulge, a teacher before administering corporal punishment would say 'Hold out your hand', someone might walk with his toes turned out). But ears can stick out, a football player can stick out his leg to trip another player, someone may stick out his elbow to make his way through a crowd... so it's not just tongues that 'stick out'.

    b

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    Re: stick out

    One other thing to be aware of, is that in the expression 'stick out like a sore thumb' the stick out could be argued to be either phrasal or not. A sore thumb would indeed be swollen, but is also obvious.

    That boy singing in an all-girl choir sticks out like a sore thumb.

    b

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    Re: stick out

    Thanks a lot BobK.

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