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Thread: Participal

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Participal

    Dear friends,

    I'm a new one in the message board. May I have someone answer my question:

    The young man, jogging in the morning every day, is very strong. (right?)

    The young man, jogging every morning, is very strong.
    (right?)

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Those sentences are okay. Is there some context you want to put them into?

    :)

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    The second is better than the first.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    The second is better than the first.
    That is true.

    :wink:

  5. #5
    Jesse Huang Guest

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    (I'm interested in sentence structure.)

    How about these another two sentences as follows:

    1. The young man, who jogs in the morning every day, is very strong. (right?)

    2. The young man, who is jogging in the morning every day, is very strong. (right?)

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Hi, Jesse , and welcome. First, while not wrong, the 'in the morning every day' phrase doesn't sound very natural- just use every morning. The present simple makes more sense as I see no need for the progressive with this repeated action.

    Of the four versions, I'd use:
    The young man, who jogs every morning , is very strong.


  7. #7
    Jesse Huang Guest

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    (I'm surprised at the answering speed :D . However, thanks a lot)

    The young man, jogging every morning, is very strong.

    "jogging every morning" is an adverbal clause, right? How do we often interprete this sentence in English?

  8. #8
    Jesse Huang Guest

    Default

    Also, how about the next sentence as follows:

    My old car, breaking down every other week, won’t last much longer.

    If "breaking down every other week" functions as an adverbal clause, how do we often interprete this sentence in English?

    And, how about this one:

    My old car, which breaks down every other week, won’t last much longer.

    Are the two sentences equal?

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Huang
    Also, how about the next sentence as follows:

    My old car, breaking down every other week, won’t last much longer.

    If "breaking down every other week" functions as an adverbal clause, how do we often interprete this sentence in English?

    And, how about this one:

    My old car, which breaks down every other week, won’t last much longer.

    Are the two sentences equal?
    The participle is a way of removing the relative clause. We often doit to cut down on the number of full verbs in the sentence. The meaning is the same.

  10. #10
    Jesse Huang Guest

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    My old car, breaking down every other week, won’t last much longer.

    Q1: "breaking down every other week" functions as adjective clause?

    Q2: Can this sentence be interpreted as:

    Because it breaks down every other week, my old car won’t last much longer.

    Q3: What is the meaning of full verbs? Please give me some examples.

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