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  1. #1
    joseph boulos Guest

    Default Two- syllable verbs

    Hi,
    In the present continuous tense, with two- syllable verbs ending in a vowel and a constant and with stress on the second syllable, we double the constant and add ing
    Please give me examples for two- syllable verbs ending in a vowel and a constant and with stress on the second syllable, also for those two- syllable verbs ending in a vowel and a constant and with stress on the first syllable.
    Many thanks,
    Joe

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    eschew ->eschewwing!??!?!? oh hell no
    'eschewing' is correct I think. From the question you asked it was the only answer that I could come up with off the top of my head: and it doesn't fit your rule!!!!

    Sorry Joseph, there is no real rule on spelling conjugations. Any rule you make will break down. You are better to just remember the words that you use often, and buy the biggest dictionary you can find for the rest.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Stress on second syllable:

    deter prefer (> deterred, preferred)

    Stress on first syllable:

    taper cater (> tapered, catered)

    b

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    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by joseph boulos View Post
    Hi,
    In the present continuous tense, with two- syllable verbs ending in a vowel and a constant and with stress on the second syllable, we double the constant and add ing
    Please give me examples for two- syllable verbs ending in a vowel and a constant and with stress on the second syllable, also for those two- syllable verbs ending in a vowel and a constant and with stress on the first syllable.
    Many thanks,
    Joe
    In AmE, we have some rules for doubling terminal consonants before adding a suffix. There are, however, many exceptions. There are also consonants that are never doubled: c, h, j, q, w, x. When a word ending in c calls for a doubling, we add k. I believe that the BrE rules are different.

    With consonants that can be doubled, we usually double the terminal consonant only when the the stress is on the last or only syllable and the vowel in that syllable is short.

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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    I believe that in a teaching context, especially for ESL, the effort required to remember all the damn rules like this is just as much or greater than remembering the words themselves!!! (And my ESL wife is agreeing with me as I type)

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by JSmiley View Post
    I believe that in a teaching context, especially for ESL, the effort required to remember all the damn rules like this is just as much or greater than remembering the words themselves!!! (And my ESL wife is agreeing with me as I type)
    I was taught this rule in grammar school and still use it daily.

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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I believe that the BrE rules are different.
    Only very slightly. Most of them involve two-syllable words ending in "-el", where the "l" is doubled in British English but not in American English:

    duelling/dueling
    cancelling/canceling
    travelling/traveling

    Also "worshipping/worshiping", where the "p" tends to be doubled in British English, but not in American English.

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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I was taught this rule in grammar school and still use it daily.
    Fair enough, but the point still stands that if you are not a native speaker and not going through grammar school (I'm sure the place I wrote that rule in my grade 9 notes has been blurred out by a puddle of drool at some point) these rules become quite overbearing.

    Personally I learned all this by reading several thousand pages per year when I was younger. It just kind of filtered in.

    Okay, Im being a troll, sorry Mike. I should just shut up and let the knowledgeable people talk.

    Jesse

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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    Only very slightly. Most of them involve two-syllable words ending in "-el", where the "l" is doubled in British English but not in American English:

    duelling/dueling
    cancelling/canceling
    travelling/traveling

    Also "worshipping/worshiping", where the "p" tends to be doubled in British English, but not in American English.
    OK, but are P and L the only differnces? What about R and the others?

  10. #10
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Two- syllable verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by JSmiley View Post
    Fair enough, but the point still stands that if you are not a native speaker and not going through grammar school (I'm sure the place I wrote that rule in my grade 9 notes has been blurred out by a puddle of drool at some point) these rules become quite overbearing.

    Personally I learned all this by reading several thousand pages per year when I was younger. It just kind of filtered in.

    Okay, Im being a troll, sorry Mike. I should just shut up and let the knowledgeable people talk.

    Jesse
    No, you're not being a troll at all. I understnd yout point about too many rules. Some rules of thumb can be very useful, however.

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