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  1. #1
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    accuse of X charge with

    What is the difference between these two wrods?

    accuse of
    charge with

  2. #2
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    If you are accused of a crime, that means that you are a suspect. Authorities have reason to believe that you may have committed a crime. The police can bring you in for questioning (of course, you have the right to remain silent, and you can have your attorney present for questioning) but they cannot legally detain you. That is, you are free to leave at any time.

    If you have been charged with a crime, authorities believe that they have enough evidence to prove you committed a crime. You will be arreseted and detained until you appear in front of a judge for a formal arraignment. There you'll have a chance to plead "guilty" or "not guilty". Usually the judge will also set an amount for your bail and will schedule a date for your trial. You'll be returned to prison, but if are able to pay the bail money, you'll be released and will remain free (usually with certain conditions, such as you are not allowed to leave the state without permission) until your official trial.

  3. #3
    Avalon is offline Member
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    fab explanation Ouisch, thanx.. then we have arrested, like someone was arrested charged with pedophilia, for instance, and cannot leave the bars at all? Imagine this dialog..
    Hes been arrested...
    Gosh! What with/for? What are the charges/ What is he being charged with/for? ... is that correct? or as I just proofread for is incorrect, used only for money matters..
    Last edited by Avalon; 11-Nov-2006 at 19:43.

  4. #4
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    I agree with Ouisch, except anyone can accuse you of committing a crime, but only the police and the courts can charge you with that crime.

    You can accuse George Bush of being a mass-murderer, or you can accuse your babysitter of being late, but you can't charge either of them with anything.

  5. #5
    curmudgeon's Avatar
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    Quote Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
    fab explanation Ouisch, thanx.. then we have arrested, like someone was arrested charged with pedophilia, for instance, and cannot leave the bars at all? Imagine this dialog..
    Hes been arrested...
    Gosh! What with/for? What are the charges/ What is he being charged with/for? ... is that correct? or as I just proofread for is incorrect, used only for money matters..

    When you say cannnot leave the bars, I assume you mean prison bars?

  6. #6
    Avalon is offline Member
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    yes, I mean prison bars...and my question is not clear...Can I say he was charged for a heinous crime, or I can only use with, in this case?

  7. #7
    curmudgeon's Avatar
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    Quote Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
    yes, I mean prison bars...and my question is not clear...Can I say he was charged for a heinous crime, or I can only use with, in this case?

    Only 'with'

  8. #8
    Avalon is offline Member
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    Okay, only charged with... thank you ..

  9. #9
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    thanks

  10. #10
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: accuse of X charge with

    This is what I have read in a textbook today:
    "Jake commited a crime when he robbed a post office. He stole 5,000 pounds. a witness managed to take a photograph of him. The police arrested him and charged him with robbery. The case came to court two months later. ..."
    I don't think I can understand the difference between charge with and accuse of already. I thought that you can be charged with some crime only if you are convicted of commiting the crime - is that right? Anyway, Jake was not convicted at the court yet!
    Is it because of the photograph? Was the verb "to charge with" used because of the fact that the police could be sure (because of the photograph) he was really guilty?

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