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  1. #1
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
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    The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Hi Teachers,

    Could you tell me how to make up an image for 'it' when 'it' has no or indistinct meaning in phrases such as 'have it in for', 'cut it out', etc.? Or 'it' does have some meaning when we use these phrases? Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Quote Originally Posted by Haihao View Post
    Hi Teachers,

    Could you tell me how to make up an image for 'it' when 'it' has no or indistinct meaning in phrases such as 'have it in for', 'cut it out', etc.? Or 'it' does have some meaning when we use these phrases? Thank you.
    I'm not sure what you mean by "image". In "cut it out" "it" refers to the behavior the speaker wants stopped.

    In the first "it" is a little hard to describe. It is something in the realm of "trouble".

  3. #3
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Thank you, Sir, for your explanation. Your descriptions such as 'behavior' and 'the realm of trouble' are exactly what I didn't hold clearly in my mind as 'image' and now I guess I do.

    Thanks again.

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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Quote Originally Posted by Haihao View Post
    Thank you, Sir, for your explanation. Your descriptions such as 'behavior' and 'the realm of trouble' are exactly what I didn't hold clearly in my mind as 'image' and now I guess I do.

    Thanks again.
    You're welcome.

  5. #5
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Good evening! Mr. MikeNewYork, from Tokyo in the morning.

    I'd like you to help me with another 'riddle' I've 'cherished' for a long time and asked around for a 'cool' resolution many times but still being far from satisfied.

    It was the 'off' in 'well off'. I'd like to first 'dish out' my 'cherished' here to see what's the matter with it.

    1. it is somewhere around 'out', so well off = off the average well = out-standingly basked economically.
    2. it has not such meaning as a common 'off' here but belongs to another realm.
    3. well off is absolutely an idiom so it makes no sense and no need to dig in.
    4. others

    Also, does the 'off' belong to the same category as it is in well off, pay off, and show off?

    Thank you in advance.

  6. #6
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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Quote Originally Posted by Haihao View Post
    Good evening! Mr. MikeNewYork, from Tokyo in the morning.

    I'd like you to help me with another 'riddle' I've 'cherished' for a long time and asked around for a 'cool' resolution many times but still being far from satisfied.

    It was the 'off' in 'well off'. I'd like to first 'dish out' my 'cherished' here to see what's the matter with it.

    1. it is somewhere around 'out', so well off = off the average well = out-standingly basked economically.
    2. it has not such meaning as a common 'off' here but belongs to another realm.
    3. well off is absolutely an idiom so it makes no sense and no need to dig in.
    4. others

    Also, does the 'off' belong to the same category as it is in well off, pay off, and show off?

    Thank you in advance.
    The "off" in "well off" roughly means "circumstanced". It is an idiom, but your thoughts in #1 are intriguing with respect to the original derivation. Being "off" the average on the good side is a plausible theory.

    I would say the "off" in "well off" is different from the other 2 "offs".

    The "off" in "pay off" has a sense of chasing away.
    The "off" in "show off" has a sense of projecting from.

  7. #7
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    I am satisfied this time, sir, and thank you very much indeed for your 'flat-out' interpretation and instruction.

    Very gratefully,
    haihao

  8. #8
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    Re: The 'it' in 'have it in for'

    Quote Originally Posted by Haihao View Post
    I am satisfied this time, sir, and thank you very much indeed for your 'flat-out' interpretation and instruction.

    Very gratefully,
    haihao
    You're very welcome.

  9. #9
    Haihao is offline Junior Member
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    Hit her on the arm vs. hit her arm.

    Hi Mr. MikeNewYork,

    Good evening again!

    Could you tell me if there are any differences between:

    1. 'hit her on the arm' and 'hit her arm'
    2. 'the gecko feed on insects' and 'the gecko feed off incects' ?

    Thank you.

  10. #10
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    Re: Hit her on the arm vs. hit her arm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Haihao View Post
    Hi Mr. MikeNewYork,

    Good evening again!

    Could you tell me if there are any differences between:

    1. 'hit her on the arm' and 'hit her arm'
    2. 'the gecko feed on insects' and 'the gecko feed off incects' ?

    Thank you.
    There is little difference bewteen the first two.

    In the second, "feed on" means to eat. "Feed off" can refer to eating also (but I would not use it when the food is small enough to be eaten whole), but it can also mean "to gain power/energy from someone else's feelings".

    He fed off her insecurities.
    He fed off his teammates' energy.

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