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Thread: Full Time

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Full Time

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    ...
    cf:

    told on him
    ratted on him
    squealed on him
    .. and ncf (just made that up - it means 'don't compare)
    grassed him up

    I suspect this is strictly BE, and very informal - it was originally strictly criminal jargon: grassing always involved telling the police. But I've heard a school-child using it to refer to another child telling a teacher something:

    I used to bring my mobile to school until Smiffy grassed me up.

    b

  2. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Full Time

    They are all wrong! It's very poor english, even informally

  3. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Full Time

    'Grass' -from the rhyming slang 'grass in the park' - 'nark', meaning informer.

    'He's a coppers nark'

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: Full Time

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    .. and ncf (just made that up - it means 'don't compare)
    grassed him up

    I suspect this is strictly BE, and very informal - it was originally strictly criminal jargon: grassing always involved telling the police. But I've heard a school-child using it to refer to another child telling a teacher something:

    I used to bring my mobile to school until Smiffy grassed me up.

    b
    Now that's a new one.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: Full Time

    Quote Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
    They are all wrong! It's very poor english, even informally
    A Scotsman complaining about poor English?

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    #16

    Re: Full Time

    Having learnt it as a foreign language, the Curmudge may well know it better than native speakers.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: Full Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Having learnt it as a foreign language, the Curmudge may well know it better than native speakers.

  7. RonBee's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: Full Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    This might be a BrE difference, but 'works a full-time job' sounds a little strange to me. I'd use 'does a full-time job'.
    It's the opposite here with "does a full-time job" sounding a little strange.

    I wonder sometimes how we can communicate at all.

  8. curmudgeon's Avatar
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    #19

    Re: Full Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Having learnt it as a foreign language, the Curmudge may well know it better than native speakers.

    I'll have you know I went to a high school. It was on top of a hill.

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