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Thread: fairy tales

  1. #1
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default fairy tales

    This is what I've read at the end of a fairy tale called "Kate Crackernuts":

    They all lived happy and died happy, and never drank out of a dry cappy.

    I suppose it's one of these phrases that usually occut at the end of fairy tales, but what does it mean literally? I can find the word "cappy" in any dictionary!
    (By the way, is it correct to use "any" with a singular noun (as I've just done it in the previous sentence)? )

    Does anybody of you know the fairy tale? I wonder where it comes from, actually... Do you think it is a typically English fairy tale?
    I've realized that I know it very well (but with some changes, though) - when I was small, my grandfather used to play the fairy tale at his video recorder for me. And I remember some Czech actors starring there... I wonder if the Czechs would shoot such a film (I mean an English fairy tale... ).Or is it written by the Brother Grimms?

  2. #2
    Lenka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: fairy tales

    English Fairy Tales - Kate Crackernuts (by Joseph Jacobs)

    Here it says it's written by Joseph Jacobs... But here Joseph Jacobs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is says that among his works are also Snowwhite etc.... That means that he didn't think the fairy tale out. And he didn't probably collect the fairy tales from other people, did he?

  3. #3
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: fairy tales

    He wopuld have collected the fairy tales rather than writing them. I am afraid I have no idea what a 'cappy' is.

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: fairy tales

    This tale came originally from Orkney, so isn't really an English tale. I think a "cappy" must just mean "cup".

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