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  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    What's the difference between 'Except' and 'Except for'?

    I looked it up in a dictionary, but I still cant understand
    the difference.

    Help me with this.

    And
    _______extreme situations, makeups
    for the two exams and the final must be
    arranged at least one week in advance.

    I can't use 'except' in this sentence, can I?
    Why is that?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What's the difference between 'Except' and 'Except for'?

    Quote Originally Posted by HelpMe
    I looked it up in a dictionary, but I still cant understand
    the difference.

    Help me with this.

    And
    _______extreme situations, makeups
    for the two exams and the final must be
    arranged at least one week in advance.

    I can't use 'except' in this sentence, can I?
    Why is that?
    "Except" and "except for" have different meanings. A good place to start is with a dictionary that defines both. This is from the AHD:

    ex·cept (ĭk-sĕpt')
    prep.
    With the exclusion of; other than; but: everyone except me.

    conj.
    If it were not for the fact that; only. Often used with that: I would buy the suit, except that it costs too much.
    Otherwise than: They didn't open their mouths except to complain.
    Unless: “And ne'er throughout the year to church thou go'st/Except it be to pray against thy foes” (Shakespeare).

    v., -cept·ed, -cept·ing, -cepts.

    v.tr.
    To leave out; exclude: An admission fee is charged, but children are excepted.

    v.intr.
    To object: Counsel excepted to the court's ruling.

    idiom:
    except for

    Were it not for: I would join you except for my cold.


    In your sentence, you want to create an exception for "extreme circumstances". That is where we use "except for" or "except in".

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